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2012年4月29日星期日

120427-纽约时报-Andrew Jacobs-陈光诚逃离囚禁 回顾一年前记者探访被挥舞扫帚暴力驱逐

录像下载: https://www.wuala.com /renyun.net/People/C/陈光诚/2012/0427/
http://video.nytimes.com/video/2012/04/27/world/asia/100000001515135/timescast-chinese-dissident-escapes.html
World | Asia Pacific
TimesCast | Chinese Dissident Escapes
April 27, 2012 — Chen Guangcheng, a blind lawyer known for taking on the case of thousands of women who had been forcibly sterilized, escapes from house arrest.
Andrew Jacobs Reports
RELATED
Produced by Rob Harris


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/28/world/asia/chen-guangcheng-blind-lawyer-escapes-house-arrest-china.html?pagewanted=all
Challenge for U.S. After Escape by China Activist
Supporters of Chen Guangcheng, via Associated Press

Chen Guangcheng, shown in an undated photograph, has been isolated since September 2010.

BEIJING — The dramatic nighttime escape of a blind rights lawyer from extralegal house arrest in his village dealt a major embarrassment to the Chinese government and left the United States, which may be sheltering him, with a new diplomatic quandary as it seeks to improve its fraught relationship with Beijing.

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Guards marched on Friday near the American Embassy, left, in Beijing. American officials did not comment on Mr. Chen's escape.

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Readers shared their thoughts on this article.

The lawyer, Chen Guangcheng, one of the best-known and most politically savvy Chinese dissidents, evaded security forces surrounding his home this week and, aided by an underground network of human rights activists, secretly made his way about 300 miles to Beijing, where he is believed to have found refuge in the American Embassy, according to advocates and Chinese officials.

An official in the Chinese Ministry of State Security on Friday said that Mr. Chen had reached the United States Embassy, but American officials would not confirm reports that Mr. Chen had found shelter there.

Mr. Chen's escape represents a significant public relations challenge for the Chinese government, which has sought to relegate him to obscurity, confining him to his home in the remote village of Dongshigu and surrounding him with plainclothes security guards, even though there are no outstanding legal charges against him.

The case also poses a major new diplomatic test for the United States. In February, the Obama administration was thrust into an internal Chinese political dispute when Wang Lijun, the former top police official from the region of Chongqing, sought refuge in the American Consulate in Chengdu. Mr. Wang revealed details about the killing of a British businessman, setting off a cascade of events that led to the downfall of Bo Xilai, who was the party chief in Chongqing and a member of China's Politburo. American diplomats said they had determined that Mr. Wang's case did not involve national security, and he was turned over to Chinese officials, prompting criticism from some in Washington about their handling of the case. Both sides insist Mr. Wang left of his own accord.

But with Mr. Chen now believed to be on the grounds of the American Embassy in Beijing, administration officials are likely to be far more cautious in handling his case. His advocacy for the handicapped and for families subject to forced abortions and other coercive population control methods is widely known in the West. He also became a symbol of the deficiencies of China's legal system after he was convicted of criminal charges in 2006 in a prosecution that Chinese lawyers — and even some officials in Beijing — felt made a mockery of China's claims to be developing better legal norms.

Mr. Chen, according to those who have spoken to him, slipped away on Sunday evening from his home in Shandong Province, where he has been held incommunicado since his release from prison in September 2010. Ai Weiwei, the artist and government critic who has also been subjected to residential detention, though far less draconian, said he had spoken to a friend who met with Mr. Chen in Beijing on Wednesday. The friend said Mr. Chen had climbed over a wall at night and evaded multiple lines of guards.

"You know he's blind, so the night to him is nothing," Mr. Ai said the friend told him. "I think that's a perfect metaphor."

Among those who helped Mr. Chen was He Peirong, a family friend who said Mr. Chen had planned his escape far in advance, staying in bed for long periods of time to trick guards into thinking he was too sick to walk. In an account she wrote on her microblog early Friday, Ms. He said that Mr. Chen had called her after fleeing the village. She said she then picked him up in her car, and they drove to Beijing. By late morning on Friday, Ms. He had been taken by public security agents from her home in Nanjing, according to Bob Fu, president of China Aid, a Christian rights group in Texas. Her microblog account was later deleted.

 A spokesman for China's foreign minister on Friday said he had no information about the episode, but one intelligence officer expressed bewilderment that Mr. Chen had evaded his local government captors and had probably entered the embassy.

"It's still not clear how this happened," the intelligence officer said. "Was this happenstance, or was it planned this way? Are there others planning to do the same?"

The timing is especially inopportune for Beijing, given that it is preparing to welcome Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner and other American officials next week for the annual Strategic and Economic Dialogue.

A vice foreign minister, Cui Tiankai, said Saturday morning that the meeting would go ahead as planned next week. Mr. Cui also played down the Chen case. "I don't think this issue will occupy much time or focus," he said, regarding the meeting. "So I have no information for you on it."

The escape creates headaches for Washington, which has been eager to improve relations with the Chinese on various economic and security issues. Those efforts have lately paid dividends, with Beijing increasingly cooperating with American diplomatic moves to pressure Iran and North Korea over their nuclear programs. China has also shown a willingness to support United Nations efforts to broker a cease-fire in Syria.

Mrs. Clinton has addressed Mr. Chen's case on several occasions, most recently in a speech on Asian policy in November that prompted a sharp rebuke from Beijing. "We are alarmed by recent incidents in Tibet of young people lighting themselves on fire in desperate acts of protest," she said then, "as well as the continued house arrest of the Chinese lawyer Chen Guangcheng. We continue to call on China to embrace a different path."

On Friday, however, the State Department's spokeswoman, Victoria Nuland, said she would make no comment about Mr. Chen's escape or his whereabouts. The White House also declined to comment, and a scheduled briefing on Mrs. Clinton's planned visit was postponed.

"Chen Guangcheng is a very strong candidate for asylum," said Susan L. Shirk, a former State Department official who is now a professor at the University of California, San Diego. "A blind lawyer who is being persecuted for exposing forced abortions? I don't think there's any question about it."

But, as in the exploding scandal surrounding Bo Xilai, the Obama administration has sought to keep itself out of China's internal politics.

Rights advocates said Mr. Chen was not seeking to leave China, but would try to negotiate his freedom with the Chinese authorities.

"He is reluctant to go overseas and wants only to live like a normal Chinese citizen," said Mr. Fu.

Shortly after news of Mr. Chen's daring escape began circulating, a video appeared on YouTube on Friday, filmed in the days since he gained his freedom, in which he described life under house arrest. The video, in the form of an appeal to Prime Minister Wen Jiabao, detailed the abuse that he and his family suffered.

He told of how his daughter was followed to school by three guards each day and how guards had kicked his wife for hours on end. "Prime Minister Wen, you owe the people an explanation," he said. "Are these atrocities the result of local officials violating the law or a result of orders from the top leadership?"

It is not the first time that Mr. Chen has sought to publicize the details of his confinement. Last year, he and his wife were reportedly severely beaten after a video they secretly recorded inside their home was smuggled out of the village and posted on the Internet. Friends say the subsequent abuse by their captors had left Mr. Chen in frail health.

Mr. Chen, 40, is a self-taught lawyer, who was once lauded by the state media for his work defending farmers and the disabled. But he angered local officials after taking on the case of thousands of women who had been forcibly sterilized in Linyi County. During a brief trial in 2006, he was sentenced to 51 months in jail on charges of destroying property and assembling a crowd to disrupt traffic — charges that advocates say were trumped up, given that he was under house arrest at the time.

After his release, he was taken directly to his family's stone farmhouse, which was turned into a makeshift prison. His wife, and for a time his young daughter, were also confined inside the house, which was ringed by surveillance cameras, floodlights and a rotating cordon of guards.

Reporters, diplomats and Chinese activists who tried to visit Mr. Chen were violently repelled by guards.

Rights advocates on Friday expressed concern for Mr. Chen and for his wife, Yuan Weijing, who activists said was left behind. Still, Mr. Fu of China Aid said he was optimistic that Mr. Chen might be able to negotiate his freedom. "The fact that he's escaped will really shake up Chinese security forces," he said. "It tells them that they are not almighty God."

Reporting was contributed by Edward Wong, Sharon LaFraniere, Michael Wines and Jane Perlez from Beijing, and Steven Lee Myers from Washington. Mia Li and Shi Da contributed research.


  1. 110217-纽约时报-陈光诚被非法软禁 记者探访被便衣看守挥舞扫把暴力驱逐
    http://lihlii.posterous.com/110217
    http://lihlii.blogspot.com/2012/04/110217.html

  2. 111009 忆通律师事务所 李劲松律师:陈光诚案详情及相关材料
    http://lihlii.blogspot.com/2012/04/111009.html
    http://lihlii.posterous.com/111009

  3. 110217-纽约时报记者冒险探访陈光诚 被便衣看守挥舞扫把暴力驱逐
    Despite Violence, Chinese Dissident's Emboldened Supporters Stream to See Him - NYTimes.com



195 Comments
NYT Picks
    LG
    Chicago

NYT Pick

"forcibly sterilized thousands of women." Wow. Clearly conceptions of human rights differ drastically from the rest of the developed world in China. On the one hand, I want to respect their autonomy, and not impose the Western humanistic vision (that even the West spends much of its time not quite living up to) on China; but then on the other hand, permanently raping thousands of the citizens officials are sworn to serve is about as terrible an act as can be imagined to this particular Westerner. If China wants to convince the world of its modernity, they need to realize that that doesn't stop at pollution and production.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended15

    roosevelt
    china

NYT Pick

This is the real-life version of "The Shawshank Redemption". This guy is a true hero. People in China are really excited and inspired by his great escape.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended58

    Matt R.
    N.Y.C.

NYT Pick

LG... Large groups of people have been sterilized without their consent HERE IN THE US. The current news about it discusses the amount of money to be paid back as compensation. If china paid the women compensation and put them on footing with the US would it all be ok? I would not for me; but you are welcome to ignore our history to make other countries seem backwards. The reality is that everyone involved in the sterilization in the US should have faced sever prison terms or worse, but instead we now debate over the value of a person to have children and figure that money is a good exchange for the ability to give life.

Please people, stop pretending that the America ideals make us better than other countries and instead try to turn thathose ideals into reality here.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 7:37 p.m.
    Recommended10

    JW
    Cherry Hill, NJ

NYT Pick

Flag

You have to understand, it's people like Mr. Chen that makes China a great country and Chinese people a great people. It's not those ruthless rulers, nor those apathetic billionaires, nor those mindless celebrities, nor those fierce athletes.

People like Mr. Chen, ultimately selfless, courageous, and perseverant, are the conscious of the people, and our hope. It's beyond question that U.S. should fight for his freedom as the basic moral obligation to the world, and to yourselves.Any other stance will be equal to sponsoring the ruthless self-interest and materialism.

    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended85
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Reader Picks
    JW
    Cherry Hill, NJ

NYT Pick

Flag

You have to understand, it's people like Mr. Chen that makes China a great country and Chinese people a great people. It's not those ruthless rulers, nor those apathetic billionaires, nor those mindless celebrities, nor those fierce athletes.

People like Mr. Chen, ultimately selfless, courageous, and perseverant, are the conscious of the people, and our hope. It's beyond question that U.S. should fight for his freedom as the basic moral obligation to the world, and to yourselves.Any other stance will be equal to sponsoring the ruthless self-interest and materialism.

    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended85
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    DemocracyNow
    East Coast

Please think about this the next time you stuff your cart with Chinese goods at Wal-Mart.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended61

    Jonathan
    Ann Arbor, MI

Wow this guy is like a ninja; being blind and escaping the cordons of all those guards. Someone should make a movie of this. Please protect him US embassy!

    April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
    Recommended59

    roosevelt
    china

NYT Pick

This is the real-life version of "The Shawshank Redemption". This guy is a true hero. People in China are really excited and inspired by his great escape.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended58

    SM
    Brooklyn, NY

Chen Guangcheng is a completely different kettle of fish from the morally ambiguous Wang Lijun. The US has to suck it up and do the right thing, for this man and his family and any suffering the consequences of assisting him.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
    Recommended45

    S. Roy
    Toronto, Ontario

"I do not think he is very smart."

Really. Let's see, he has been tortured, imprisoned, his wife was beaten, his daughter is followed everyday to school, his relatives' homes invaded, etc. etc.

What would you have done - esteemed Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez of Austin, Texas?

And he is not smart - to escape? He is a GENUINE hero - in the strictest sense of the word - by rising up against the one of most brutal regimes. It is also so very easy to comment, chastise, ridicule - even pontificate - living in a democratic country. But to do that in a totalitarian country such as China is something ENTIRELY different.

    In reply to Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez
    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended44

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

Those who are attempting to portray an equivalence between the human rights record of the American and Chinese governments should try this little experiment. Go to Times Square, and unfurl a banner that says "Down with the American government." See what happens. Then, make a banner that says "Down with the Chinese government," and try unfurling it in Tiananmen Square.

Please note that the experiment does not work the other way around.

    April 28, 2012 at 3:32 a.m.
    Recommended38

    peace
    atlanta

We import most of our goods from them with no regard to to their abuses. Civil rights once meant something to the USA. Horrible!

    April 27, 2012 at 5:07 p.m.
    Recommended37

    elizabeth
    seattle

Ricardo G. Valdez,
The more you read, the more you'll understand. Even before you read and understand, I think you can grasp that hiding in a safe place and getting the word out is better than being imprisoned and abused in your home. This man is more concerned with bringing abuses to light, and trying to improve life for many, than with his own comfort. Smart, yes, and also courageous and compassionate.

    In reply to Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez
    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended34

    DanBal
    Paris

If this dissident really is in the U.S. embassy in Beijing, then President Obama can prove he is not just the cynical pol he's been playing for the past three years. If he throws Chen under the bus and hands him over to the Chinese authorities, he has forfeited any moral authority he has left.

    April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
    Recommended33

    happykt
    Austin

That's a great system the Chinese government has over there -- if you complain about government neglect or abuse, or stick up for human and civil rights, they beat the hell out of you throw you in prison and if you get out of prison alive, they keep you a prisoner in your own house, while government thugs still beat and torture you ... And the Chinese governement calls their form of government ideal?

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended32

    M. Paire
    NYC

His family was beaten and punished, and for what? Being genetically linked? This kind of draconian behavior is outrageous, unacceptable, and should be condemned. If the Communist party has any moral conscience at all, they will discipline the police who handled this like a bunch of triad gangsters rather than protectors of the citizens.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:58 p.m.
    Recommended31

    Miranda Right
    New York

I heard the woman who helped him flee has already been arrested. God help her.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:59 p.m.
    Recommended29

    Anne
    O.

It's a shame some people would dismiss a blind civilian being tortured in his own home as a mere negative PR stunt. Maybe if your own family were beaten, bugged and followed, you'd think differently.

Meanwhile, how many months behind bars do you think corrupt officials are actually serving?

    In reply to Something else
    April 27, 2012 at 7:45 p.m.
    Recommended26

    zg
    Boston, MA

This blind man self-taught himself to be a lawyer (not one that works in a law firm, but one that gives free legal advice in rural China), stood up to the brutal abortion policy in the Shangdong province, and now escaped layers of guard surrounding his house in the night, and traveled to Beijing, and hopefully to the US embassy. He is such an inspiration to me!

    April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
    Recommended26

    Mainland Chinese
    Shanghai

Last night a Chinese micro-blog said Chen had boarded a flight to the U.S.

If that's true, I thank you, the U.S. government. You absolutely did the right thing, again.

I have to agree, the Chinese government is absolutely goons and thugs. I am so glad we have heroes like Chen, who gives us some hope in the darkness.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended25

    Kittakimma
    China

Comparing Julian Assange to Mr. Chen is grotesque.

    In reply to phylum chordata
    April 27, 2012 at 10:33 p.m.
    Recommended24

    zg
    Boston, MA

I actually think his move will serve himself and his family better in the long term. Under house arrest, those lawless and ruthless security guards can do just about anything to them: harassing, beating, humiliating ... Now he has successfully put himself under the spotlight of international medias, and hopefully also in between the diplomatic tension between US and CHINA, he himself will be safe, and so is his wife, daughter and the rest of his family. Hopefully, with the aid of the American diplomats, he can negotiate his safety and security from top Chinese officials.

Relating this Chen Guangcheng incident to a previous one involving the former police chief of Chongqing, it seems that whenever a Chinese citizen needs to get certain matters resolved, the US embassy or consulate is the place to go. What a shame on the Chinese government!

    In reply to Matt R.
    April 27, 2012 at 7:45 p.m.
    Recommended24

    Butler Chen
    oversee

Chen guang cheng is one of most brave man in China who inspires unaccountable Chinese pursuing democracy and freedom in China. Because someone like chen guang cheng, I never ever lose hope for the people living in my country ,China. And one day , my generation ,the many generation after us could live in a country which embraces freedom and democracy.
Let 's cross the fingers for chen guangcheng and his family.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:09 a.m.
    Recommended22

    wonderwall
    Oakland

Defect to the USA Mr. Chen. My family will take you in.

Also "Dr" Ricardo, how would you like to be beaten in your own house?

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended21

    Eric Chang
    Palo Alto

How long will we continue tolerate the human right abuses in China? after iPhone10 launch? How many iPads can we scroll at the same time?

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended21

    Zhaolu Song
    Bellevue, WA

If the story is true, this in fact might be the best scenario the Chinese gov't can hope for. What the govt is afraid of is Mr. Chen's influence among the Chinese people. That's why they confined him so he could not interact with others. Now if he comes to the us (Chinese govt would be happy to let this happen) he will lose his ability yo make any real impact to China. Two decades ago, many student leaders fled China after tiananmen square. How many people in China today still remember their names?

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended20

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

Good God, do you have any idea what it's like to live in China? Try asking a Tibetan.

I'm really getting fed up with this kind of unthinking anti-Americanism. How do you think the United States ranks compared to other countries on corruption? (You'd apparently be surprised.) Racism? (Again, you'd be surprised -- though if you asked yourself how many other majority white countries have elected black leaders, you could answer your own question.)

As to being a bully in the world, who would you suggest as a more generous great power? There is none even remotely comparable in history.

The United States has its flaws, yes, but comparing this country to an authoritarian state like China is beyond the pale.

    In reply to Raphael
    April 28, 2012 at 2:56 a.m.
    Recommended20

    3ddi3 B
    NYC

I beg to differ, Wang was no saint, if you read something about this guy he was part of the corrupt regime in that city with Bo. Mr Guangcheng is a much more different case that deserves our attention.
Mr. Wang's desertion would have given us more trouble because he was not really a political refugee, on what basis would we have protected him and how do we get him out?
Mt Guangcheng is a known activist and has been incarcerated for his beliefs and actions.

    In reply to Jonathan
    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended20

    Anne
    O.

I hope he stays safe and healthy. We know about too many rights activists and lawyers who become imprisoned or forcibly institutionalized, where they only emerge later on to be handicapped, mentally disabled or dead. Add to that, that any journalists who dared approached the vicinity of his home were harassed by goons who work above and behind any 'laws'. Disgusting.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended20

    Chinese
    China Beijing

Using your mind, true or false is a question! I could hardly believe this news. Everything has two sides, even for a country. I have to admit that there are some severe problems in china, there's also inspiring change in China. For the one child problem that mentioned above, it is the only choice for China to control the enormous population. Though it's might unbelievable for foreigners who have religions. The culture diversely different in some countries. To show more respect to other people other countries other culture is the sprits of Beijing, I am really proud of my city and my country, and respect yours. Hope you have the same sprits with me.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended18

    Chinese Netizen
    USA

Truly, isn't it July? With local "authorities" like the ones abusing him, where else could Mr Chen have gone? To many people, regardless of its faults, America is still the beacon of hope.

    In reply to July LIu
    April 27, 2012 at 9:18 p.m.
    Recommended18

    Blackwater
    Seattle

There is no question: the American authorities need to get Chen safely out of China. Sadly, I think his wife and some of his remaining family are as good as dead, regardless of what happens to Mr Chen. His voice is the one that needs to survive, to tell his story to the world, and to common Chinese.

If Chen is released back into the custody of the thugs who run China, there won't be enough of him left to fill a can of dog food.

I fear that the Politburo saw "Eating Raoul" long ago, and saw it as a productive model of what to do with political prisoners. I'm taking bets that Wang Lijun has for some weeks been languishing on a Beijing pet store shelf.

    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended18

    July LIu
    Zhuhai,China

It's ironnic,when a Chinese has trouble, the first place he turns to is American embassy!

    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended18

    keefie
    .co

I want to be proud to be an american. I expect the President to put the interests of Mr. Chen, his family, and his helpers first. This will require doing a deal with the government of PRC, on that basis. Quite apart from the ethics of the matter, I hope that the President will consider the effect in this country if he hands Mr. Chen back.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended17

    Gary McCray
    Fort Bragg CA

If Obama sends this guy back he will lose my vote and I would rather be dead than see Romney president.

Just a thought Mr. President, while your contemplating this.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:52 p.m.
    Recommended17

    Phoenix
    nyc

Not just goods at Walmart, you might want to add Apple products to that list too, and just about 99% of what we have in this country comes from China. But doubtful people will forefeit anything. This country wants it now and cheap.

    In reply to DemocracyNow
    April 27, 2012 at 7:21 p.m.
    Recommended17

    Tom Gong
    China

I admit what you are saying is the fact. But please be aware of the fact that it took hundreds of years for America to be like this. For China, it is only for a few decades. The progress China has made in economy and politics are indeed "radical" from many aspects.

Also it is wrong that you say "do you have any idea what it's like to live in China? Try asking a Tibetan." The Tibetan you can ask is probably those who are being exiled from China. For sure, their words are against China. I am not excusing for my country. I admit there is still a lot to do for us. But I hope more westerners can indeed go to China on their own, you will find quite amazingly....wow, I can go to almost anywhere I want. wow, it is not a country I presumed that is full of oppression. People here do have freedom.

The report of western media is more often than not only a facet of the real China. It's like watching China through a steorotyped glasses. No wonder there is a prevalent discontent to China.

More Mr.Chens are emerging, the government is making constant compromise and pushing this country forward.

Just please explore the real China. Asking the Tibetans is far less enough to know the real situation and gain an all-round perspective on China.

    In reply to Josh Hill
    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended16

    Jeff Stockwell
    Atlanta, GA

This incident is a reminder of what kind of China is rising. The legal system is suppose to be a system of justice. Where those who commit true crimes and those who have wrong others face justice. The legal system should be independent from the government, influential groups, and individuals. The law should be impartial available. The case of Mr. Chen and others has provided a window into China's legal system. The legal system in China is controlled by government officials, prosecutors, and police who can trump up charges and order thugs to do their dirty work. This kind of China is not good for the Chinese people and it is not good for the International Community. Though China is making great strides and realizing manny achievements, they are a dark cloud on the horizon.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:13 a.m.
    Recommended16

    rlk
    chappaqua, ny

This may be a diplomatic dilemma. It is not, under any circumstances, a moral dilemma.

In terms of human rights it's a glaringly clear decision.

Support him and grant him asylum.

It's the only right and moral path.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
    Recommended16

    Raphael
    Florida

Please,give some thought before reacting. Remember that if you point a finger at China, 3 fingers are pointing back. We, the U.S., still have a long way to go to earase racism, corruption, home grown killings with too many hand guns, and a growing reputation of being too much of a bully in the world. China has come a long way since the 1949 revolution, and still has a long way to go, but the times are a changing fast. I love our U.S., and the many good things we do in the world, and hope we will continue to be good for goodness sake, and get our troops back home out of harms way. Thanks,

    April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
    Recommended16

    phylum chordata
    earth

Maybe Mr. Assange will seek relief at the Chinese embassy in London. Anyone who thinks he's not a political prisoner is dreaming.

    April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
    Recommended16

    Anne
    O.

@David, The only "holier-than-thou" attitude is dredging up tragic past events in a desperate attempt to deflect current abuses like some sort of a balancing sheet game.

This blind lawyer has risked his own life to defend the defenseless, no amount of carbon emissions or shameful policies, of any country, will change that fact.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
    Recommended16

    SCB
    Virginia USA

Blake, in response to your question about why Washington should care, let me respond with a quote from Martin Luther King Jr.:

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."

    In reply to Blake
    April 27, 2012 at 9:15 p.m.
    Recommended15

    S. Roy
    Toronto, Ontario

Better yet, each reader should ALSO write to Walmart AND other companies else that why they must NOT source Chinese made products - particularly if products are assembled in and even if the parts are made in Linyi County.

According to The Economist magazine:

"The Boston Consulting Group reckons that in areas such as transport, computers, fabricated metals and machinery, 10-30% of the goods that America now imports from China could be made at home by 2020, boosting American output by $20 billion-55 billion a year."

Let's start it NOW!!

    In reply to DemocracyNow
    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended15

    LG
    Chicago

NYT Pick

"forcibly sterilized thousands of women." Wow. Clearly conceptions of human rights differ drastically from the rest of the developed world in China. On the one hand, I want to respect their autonomy, and not impose the Western humanistic vision (that even the West spends much of its time not quite living up to) on China; but then on the other hand, permanently raping thousands of the citizens officials are sworn to serve is about as terrible an act as can be imagined to this particular Westerner. If China wants to convince the world of its modernity, they need to realize that that doesn't stop at pollution and production.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended15

    Miranda Right
    New York

Generally we frown upon police brutality here. We also report on it, comment on it, have the ability to search the internet for it without it being deleted by government watchdogs. That distinguishing peculiarity called 'Freedom of Press' is what allows us to continue to make progress. And for the record I have lived in China. Have you?

    In reply to Raphael
    April 28, 2012 at 1:59 a.m.
    Recommended14

    Trevor
    Diaz

I only hope and wish Dalai Lama can go back to his Potala Palace after the colapse of this communist regime followed by total disintegration of China like the Soviets soon after the fall of Berlin Wall.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
    Recommended13

    blackmamba
    IL

Both the People's Republic of China and the United States of America have their own national interests and values which may or may not coincide. And those values differ on the domestic and the foreign fronts.

America must realize that whatever it does becomes a floor and justification for any other nation doing like wise. America leads the world in the number of it's citizens who are incarcerated in prison or involved in some stage of the criminal justice system. Pointing out that the vast majority of them are poor black and brown conflicts with America's posture as a nation of laws with freedom and liberty where all are treated equally. Poverty is rampant in America and income inequality is at record levels. Millions of Americans have no access to quality affordable health care.

Imagine that this situation was reversed. What would America expect or want from China?

China has already learned that it can invade and occupy nations anywhere in the world in a preemptive strike. China has also learned that it can kidnap, torture, and indefinititely detain it's enemies. China has learned that it can kill any of it's citizens without judicial or due process of any knd.

This is always about American values and interests. It does not matter how bad or hypocritical other nations may be in any situation. If we both act in the same manner then this only about power and self interest.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended12

    Alexander K.
    Minnesota

Sounds like Mr. Chen is Nobel Peace Prize material. I hope our Nobel Prize winning president will prove he was worthy and stand up for what it right.

In fact, wouldn't it be great to live in a country that always stands up for the principles laid out in its constitution instead of playing political games? This wouldn't be so difficult if we were a real democracy, rather than a plutocracy looking out for the moneyed interests (Apple, Wal-Mart, etc.).

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended12

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

You have got to be kidding.

    In reply to Binkky
    April 28, 2012 at 2:49 a.m.
    Recommended12

    3ddi3 B
    NYC

We do take dissidents, your ignorance is almost unreal; do you know that any citizen of Cuba is automatically given political immigration status?
And have you ever heard of Braille or any other languages for the blind? Are you saying that blind people should not be allowed to be educated?

    In reply to Blake
    April 27, 2012 at 9:14 p.m.
    Recommended12

    Jonathan
    Ann Arbor, MI

If Chen is at the US Embassy, and we hand him over to the police like we did Wang Lijun, then sadly we are no better that them. Let's hope democracy and freedom rule the day!

    April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
    Recommended12

    David
    Sacramento, CA

China is not modern; they're catching up not only economically, but socially, with the West in a fraction of the time it took the U.S. and Europe to go through the Industrial Revolution and beyond. Take a look at the gilded age and eugenics programs in the U.S. less than a hundred years ago if you want an example of forced sterilization. Modernity? Certain political parties want to control women's reproductive rights. Minorities didn't have rights a generation ago, and gays are still fighting for theirs. BP Deep Horizon? Guantanamo? Amazon warehouse sweat shops? Martin's murder? I could go on.

By the way, the average American still causes 4-5 times the amount of GHG emissions than the average Chinese (and it would be more if we didn't export our dirtiest manufacturing to them), so no need for a holier-than-thou attitude.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 7:38 p.m.
    Recommended12

    Bob
    Chicago

Dr. Valdez, it doesn't seem Mr. Chen's plan is to live at the US Embassy long-term. Rather, that the local authorities were abusing their power and that he might now negotiate a settlement with the national Chinese government to set him free. Regardless, hiding in a friendly embassy sounds like a better alternative than being surrounded by violent, harassing guards.

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended11

    Charles
    Clifton, NJ

Great reporting by Andrew Jacobs, and it shows the disturbing relationship that we have with China. With the old Russia (or the "Soviet Union", as some clueless Romney aides still call it) the relationship was clear. We give asylum to their dissidents.

But the Right Wing Christian Capitalist element here has to to choose between capitalist profits that depend on the cheap goods from Chinese Communist atheists and the Christian teachings of our democracy. They choose the profits. So the US has a problem in dealing with China. No politician, Democrat or Republican, in this country has any solid strategy to deal with China because voters love those cheap goods, and our executives and investors make enhanced profits from them.

It should be simple: We cannot trust the Chinese government. But instead we are in a very precarious dance with this strange bed-fellow. One theory is that democracy cannot last. It may well be that the Chinese brand of "communist capitalism" will be the new power. It produces the wealth that people want, relegating human rights to be an insignificant ideal of the few.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended10

    CityBumpkin
    Earth

The US government does need to clean up its own act in many areas, but doing the wrong thing here won't make anything better.

Don't turn Chen over.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
    Recommended10

    pj
    buffalo ny

Shame on the united states for repeatedly failing to call china out on their horrible record of human rights abuses for decades. Turning a blind eye because of money and energy policy. Good for Mr Chen for having more courage and more humanity than everyone in the world governments put together. his entire family and any friends who may have placed themselves in danger by helping him should be given asylum in the US, Great Britain and any other country who thinks of itself as remotely humane. This draconian evil empire needs to be stopped in it's tracks - money and energy should be no excuse for doing what's right.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:58 p.m.
    Recommended10

    Jonathan
    Ann Arbor, MI

Ever heard of Braille? In China it is called Xiànxíng Mángwén. I learned that from Google. Ever heard of Google?

    In reply to Blake
    April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
    Recommended10

    Matt R.
    N.Y.C.

NYT Pick

LG... Large groups of people have been sterilized without their consent HERE IN THE US. The current news about it discusses the amount of money to be paid back as compensation. If china paid the women compensation and put them on footing with the US would it all be ok? I would not for me; but you are welcome to ignore our history to make other countries seem backwards. The reality is that everyone involved in the sterilization in the US should have faced sever prison terms or worse, but instead we now debate over the value of a person to have children and figure that money is a good exchange for the ability to give life.

Please people, stop pretending that the America ideals make us better than other countries and instead try to turn thathose ideals into reality here.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 7:37 p.m.
    Recommended10

    Steve
    Austin

The argument that the United States is at least better than China is stale. Educate yourself with the NDAA along with DHS wire tapping.

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    In reply to Josh Hill
    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended9

    Judy
    Los Angeles

China's persistent intimidation with unjustified convictions and unlawful home detention of dissidents advocating human rights, clearly signals its determination to retain its power to control by the rule of rulers.
The previous comment equates America with the dollar . Is our Constitution really a dinosaur? President Obama, Mr Chen is the Voice of Democracy . Validate it and our nation.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended9

    Binkky
    In Canada

The States is in no position to point the finger of condemnation for human rights abuse at anyone else. Glasses houses and all. Gitmo and all. People dying in immigration jails; Drones, Secret and Public Assassinations, Imprisonment forever without charge or access to representation. Total information awareness. Wise up.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
    Recommended9

    KC
    San Francisco

If the artist you refer to in your comment is Ai Wei Wei, I would suggest you take the time to see some of his work before condemning him as a "straw man". Some of his art is powerful and political. Having had the opportunity to see an exhibition of his work abroad, it is easy to understand how an authoritarian government would not be happy with its political content.

I might add that one's inclusion in Wikipedia is not the be all and end all of political or moral importance.

    In reply to Something else
    April 27, 2012 at 10:36 p.m.
    Recommended9

    Gary McCray
    Fort Bragg CA

China's government has greatly improved the standard of living for most Chinese.

But they have never been considerate of dissent and their human rights abuses are a travesty for a major government.

Unfortunately in spite of much crowd delivered rhetoric to the contrary, the people who comprise the current Chinese government suffer from the same self serving and power hungry greed that in many ways is sabotaging our own government.

Corporations or Governments, people are week and prone to take care of themselves at the expense of any altruism.

And the worst tend to float to the top.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:37 p.m.
    Recommended9

    GRACE
    HINTERLANDS

If you can read, that is read critically and analyze information being visually impaired should not and would not become an obstacle in becoming a lawyer in the US, and I imagine in China as well.

Ever heard of braille?

    In reply to Blake
    April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
    Recommended9

    Todd
    Atlanta

someone always has to bring up Wal-Mart, right? News flash: Most of the stuff we buy is manufactured in a low-cost country, be it China, India, or elsewhere. Welcome to the global economy. If you think trade wars are a means towards promoting human rights you are flat out wrong. I hope you feel better about yourself, though. That's all you want, after all.

    April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
    Recommended9

    Cory
    Orchard Park, NY

What do you want people to do who can only afford to shop at Walmart, where the majority of their goods are made by the Chinese? Raise sheep and buy a loom so their kids can have clothes? If you pay a billion workers an extra two cents an hour to make pants, that's an extra 20 million dollars an hour it costs to run your operation. An extreme example but you get my point. Chinese factories employ unskilled workers in numbers Westerners can barely fathom. At that scale, even small changes can cost enormous amounts of money, and that cost ultimately gets passed along to consumers. Americans are good people and would pay more for fair goods, but in an economy where the middle class is rapidly disappearing, many of them simply cannot afford to do so.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:40 p.m.
    Recommended9

    sayitstr8
    sc

AMERICANS WHO WANT TO MAKE MONEY VIA CHINA - YOU ARE PART OF HIS AND HIS WIFE'S ABUSE - please have some courage and read on.

understand this: you want to make money, fair enough. but when you support China with your American dollars, you are part of this action, too. they are not separate. when you look at your dividends from your investments in China, please see his wife being kicked repeatedly as you look at your check.

do you see how it works? It is real. but i do not say this to induce guilt - only awareness. so, if you want to take advantage of China's cheap labor, etc. and products, and companies, fine, do it - but maybe do this too: for everything you take from those ACTIVELY DO SOMETHING to try to change something in China. otherwise you are just part of the chain of torture, antidemocratic action, and abuse. And no real American would want to be part of that, would we?

    April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
    Recommended9

    Phoenix
    nyc

Civil rights do not enter into the picture when we want our i-pads. pods, game boys, WII, stuff, nintendo, more stuff cheap and fast. Don't ever forget that. This country has lost it's footing and I'm affraid it's all man for himself. Nothing more.

    In reply to peace
    April 27, 2012 at 7:23 p.m.
    Recommended9

    cofi
    Chicago

When the the Christian ruled US is still struggling with the abortion rights, how does US claim its modernity?

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended9

    AlexDeng
    NYC

The US Admin has been using human rights issue (and among other things) as bargaining chips to deter China in a political brinksmanship. The US Admin determines to re-enter Pacific Asia rim to contain the rising Chinese influence. The US Admin likes to use these issues as pinch lines in publicity stints. All the activities are just pawns in the game. Wang Lijun, who sought refuge at the US Embassy, once described himself as being a chewing gum (that could be easily spit out once it has served its purpose). He is an intelligent person who has recognized the evils in all politicians early on.
By escaping to the US Embassys, both Chen Guangcheng and Wang Lijun have succeeded in raising their case profiles to an international level, and thus forcing both the Chinese and the US Admin to deal with their cases openly.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended8

    S. C.
    Mclean, VA

Anyone believes the story of a blind man able to escape cordon of security force must be the biggest oxymoron on earth. Obviously, China intentionally let this blind man go just to bring a needless distraction to a closure. Now, the ball is on our Court. We have to be preoccupied by this man for a long time - a man has no intelligence value or value of any kind to us whatsoever.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:12 a.m.
    Recommended8

    GRACE
    HINTERLANDS

It is always the common man/woman chosen by providence to bring about change to the mindset of millions. I can think of a few: MLK, Malcolm X, Fannie Lou Hammer, Soujourner Truth Gloria Steninan(sp)

    In reply to Something else
    April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
    Recommended8

    Stephen
    Shanghai

While I agree that the US must provide asylum to Chen Guangcheng, his family and helpers, I have questions for those who want to boycott Chinese-made goods. Are you enabling the dictators in Beijing or are you helping the good Chinese people? If you want to burn flags, do not burn Chinese flags, especially the flag of the ROC, just burn the flag of the CCP. For if your justified anger against oppression turns to racial hatred against all Chinese, you become no different from the CCP.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:12 a.m.
    Recommended7

    Sam
    Moraga, CA

It is a little difficult to express properly my contempt for this comment.

For the first part, blind people can learn and participate in society just like everyone else. For instance, the British politician David Blunkett. Blind from birth, he attended University, graduated in Political Science, was elected a Member of Parliament and rose to become Home Secretary - one of the great offices of State. Prejudice against disabled people has no part in this discussion.

For the second, the United States is the land of the free. Our system may not be perfect, but it is better than anything else in this world. If we truly believe in freedom then we should embrace those who are fighting for freedom in their own countries and ask for our help. It seems clear that Mr Chen wishes to live in China; free to express his opinions without harassment by the authorities. The idea that he is simply seeking a free ride to life in the United States is an insult to both him and the ideals he represents.

    In reply to Blake
    April 28, 2012 at 2:00 a.m.
    Recommended7

    Richard
    Los Angeles

How many more examples do we Americans need before we stop shipping our jobs to China? Every Apple iPad you buy is underwriting this corrupt regime.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:09 a.m.
    Recommended7

    paul m
    boston ma

blasmaic , the very isolated and spartan house arrest where he had no opportunity to communicate with any one outside , receive news etc or receive adequate medical treatments etc I would only consider "comfortable" relative to the prison treatment of human rights activist Ni Yulan whom guards beat so ferociously they crippled her.

    In reply to JW
    April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
    Recommended7

    Hypatia
    Santa Monica CA

Hmmm...wonder if the Chinese guards were instructed to not only look away, but actually help Chen "escape..."his "heavily-guarded" place of detention.

Maybe the regime decided it's better for them to pass the problem to the Americans, assume an aggrieved posture, and not have to take heat about this brave man any more.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:53 p.m.
    Recommended7

    phylum chordata
    earth

Maybe if the uncharged Bradley Manning escapes, Americans will cheer his shelter in the Chinese embassy too.

    In reply to peace
    April 27, 2012 at 9:04 p.m.
    Recommended7

    3ddi3 B
    NYC

So under your dellusional belief, only worthy people are entitled to a Wikipedia entry?
So how did Christian Bale hear of him? Look at his video on Youtube.

    In reply to Something else
    April 27, 2012 at 10:32 p.m.
    Recommended7

    3ddi3 B
    NYC

Your last statement is the result of the first statement, that is our jobs have disappeared for low quality and cost products, we have moved from a quality society to a disposable one, it all maximizes corporate profit.
The question is, let's look at the health of the American economy before we turned into this, the American educational system was the envy of the world, we had the best infrastructure, the social mobility was at its highest, and now what?

    In reply to Cory
    April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
    Recommended7

    cyworld
    vancouver

"A blind man has escaped from his heavily guarded home", Heavily! OMG, the guards must be blind too! So this guy can travel cross 3 provinces to Beijing that is over 400KM away without chasing and questioning by the local authorities.Guess what, they must full of blind police in their force as well.

    In reply to fairmount2010
    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended7

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

Obama has his flaws, but being a "cynical pol" isn't one of them.

    In reply to DanBal
    April 28, 2012 at 2:51 a.m.
    Recommended6

    harry
    michigan

So how do people expect the Chinese to enforce the one child rule? Ask people kindly to only have one child? It is in China's interest to control their population and its none of our business. . I have zero love for the PRC but on this issue I could care less.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
    Recommended6

    SKC
    Los Altos

The issue is not the "imperfection" of the legal system in mainland China but the total lack of accountability of it, and the persecution of dissidents. It is the kind of things that the CCP exploited brilliantly during the civil war against the KMT government. I don't believe the people would have supported the CCP against the KMT during the civil war had they known the replacement would have been by today's system under the CCP.

    In reply to Jennie PC Chiang
    April 28, 2012 at 2:04 a.m.
    Recommended6

    MAC
    OR

Hahaha, Blake, if "can you please give me the name of a blind lawyer in America" was supposed to be a challenge, I accept:
http://www.blindlawyer.org/

    In reply to Blake
    April 28, 2012 at 2:02 a.m.
    Recommended6

    J Stewart
    Boston

Please don't become one of those who don't vote! For every single person who doesn't vote, the opposition makes a gain equivalent of 2 votes. It is to this end that some states are making it harder for targetted groups to vote, or to discourage others from voting with their multi-million dollar media buys. To not vote is to give teeth to the monster unleashed by "Citizens United".

    In reply to Gary McCray
    April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
    Recommended6

    Miranda Right
    New York

If the journalists who attempted to obtain the real story weren't harassed as well, the media would have gotten the full story earlier on and none of this would have to have happened.

I don't know why you insist on futile comparisons between US in the past and China in the present. What we should be examining is the rights of a normal Chinese citizen with no government connections, and the behavior of government officials who consider themselves above the law, and authorize their yes-men to beat up whomever they want.

No one denies that corruption is everywhere. But when it comes to light, how one handles it must reflect the values of today, 2012, we're all exchanging currency in present day, we should obey human rights of present day, not the previous century.

And the dithering language of whether his rights "might" or "might not" have been violated is especially disturbing given his accounts that his mother and wife were beaten and have broken bones to prove it.

    In reply to Jennie PC Chiang
    April 28, 2012 at 1:58 a.m.
    Recommended6

    Brian
    NY

Well, I guess we're getting the "fair and balanced" view here.

President Obama has actually restored a measure of moral authority to our Presidency. Not nearly enough, seeing that it was totally stripped away and might even be said to have gone into a negative position under President Bush, et.al. In fact, I don't foresee a full measure of moral authority in the Presidency until Bush, Cheney, etc. are put on trial for war crimes.

I hope Obama can find a way to help Mr. Chen and his friends and family without causing major hurt to more innocents. Chen certainly deserves it. I am much more confident he can do it than I ever could have been with Bush.

    In reply to DanBal
    April 28, 2012 at 1:58 a.m.
    Recommended6

    Bill Wilde
    NJ

Of course our government should protect this hero. There is nothing to debate here, returning Mr. Chen to chinese communist tyrants would be unconscionable.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:08 a.m.
    Recommended6

    madupont
    Lancaster

Do you forget that you are profoundly in debt to the PRC, have nothing with which to recompense them unless they want to take slave labor from the population that Romney and GOP plan to reduce to lower/lesser level of American citizenship. This goes right back to the deal Nixon and Kissinger made and the Bush family borrowed on. See if the Party lives up to their Republican standards as Romney thinks he knows better than Huntsman for instance.

    In reply to pj
    April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
    Recommended6

    Charles A.
    New York, NY

Daredevil. Now, who wants to get sued by Marvel?

    In reply to Jonathan
    April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
    Recommended6

    SCB
    Virginia USA

On the contrary, Mr. Chen's case illustrates perfectly the greed, corruption, cruelty and lawlessness of the Communist Party of China.

    In reply to Something else
    April 27, 2012 at 7:59 p.m.
    Recommended6

    hunkerdown
    lancaster

Finally a little guile from this administration...at least, internationally.
When can we expect a few clever negotiating ploys in dealing with Congress???

    April 27, 2012 at 7:46 p.m.
    Recommended6

    Blake
    NYC

I do not like what Beijing has done to him, but I have two questions to ask.

First, with all due respect, how can a blind man or woman become a lawyer? How can he or she practice law? I like blind justice, but a person who cannot read can be easily misled and manipulated by others.

Second, why should Washington get so deeply involved in other country's issues? Maybe you say this is not a small issue, but rather a matter of principle. Fair enough. If so, we should take care of our business first. America, like all other societies, is not perfect. Also if we wanted to take in dissidents, millions would be happy to become dissidents and come here.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:38 p.m.
    Recommended6

    Phoenix
    nyc

And yet after hearing another tale of abuse led and approved by the most corrupt government we continue to do business with them. Hard to believe. And still they are givered favored nation status courtesy of the USA.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended6

    Pierce Randall
    Atlanta, GA

That's a tough case. Better relations with China, or respecting human rights?

If the US protects this guy, then probably our connections with China could cushion the blow. After all, the US does not have terrible relations with France, which held Roman Polanski. On the other hand, if the US were to protect Fu, then other dissidents might seek asylum in US embassies. Eventually, this could get out of hand, and US-Chinese relations could become a bit tenser. The consequences of good Chinese-US relations are great, because we're two economic superpowers that represent different spheres of interest in a world that's still politically divided.

On the other hand, protecting human rights is important. It's also important to not that China does not have sovereign rights in this case. If their detention of Fu is a violation of Fu's civil rights--as it certainly seems to be--then Chinese national sovereignty is not entitled to US forbearance with respect to Fu's detention, any more than thieves are entitled to the forbearance of others that they keep what they have stolen. It might be prudent to act as though China's sovereign rights are inviolate, to avoid bad consequences, but this would be a useful illusion.

It seems like the best thing we could do would be to arrange for a country that has little interest in good Chinese relations to take Fu. I'm not sure who that would be--Israel? Argentina? Uruguay?

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended6

    Fiber Laser
    Ottawa

Mr. Chen is a hero, to me, and to many common Chinese.

But you see, Mr. Chen is not prosecuted by Mr. Bo Xilai, the purged communist party red star in Chongqing whose wife murder a British businessman.

Many Chinese, and many Westerner, deem the red star Bo XIlai a devil, premier Wen Jiabao a worthy man, president Hu Jintao an trustworthy man. But to me, or to many Chinese with deeper comprehension of communist party, they are the same.

The news say that, the Briton was killed by Bo, many Chongqing businessman and layers were imprisoned by Bo, trillion dollars was pillaged by Bo, "red song campaign" was aroused by Bo.

But many Chinese know: Mr. Chen Guangcheng a layer in Shandong province , was not prosecuted by Bo in Chongqing; Mr. Qian a village head in Zhejiang province, was killed by local government head instead of Bo in Chongqing; no evidence is presented that Mr. Bo Xilai is corrupt while premier Wen Jiabao and president Hu Jintao are clean; it's President Hu Jintao instead of Bo XIlai said that North Korea is always correct in politic.

In Chinese rumor, each top Chinese politic family runs a "big business". Premier Wen's family is the top of these tops.

Now you know, why many Chinese sympathize Bo Xilai's downfall------ he is not the dirtiest in communist party, perhaps a relatively cleaner boss,.

    April 28, 2012 at 5:35 p.m.
    Recommended5

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

What 3ddi3 B said. Put simply, the reason working Americans have been impoverished is because globalization removed barriers to billions of low-skilled laborers who will work under terrible conditions for subsistence wages. Since labor costs are high, to compete, companies must move their factories overseas. It doesn't help that countries like China manipulate their currency, bar our products, steal our intellectual property, trash the environment, engage in industrial espionage, and play other cynical games, such as illegally restricting exports of rare earths to force companies to move production to China. But the real blame rests with us: big business, and the politicians in its employ, sold us down the river, and we the public have been too stupid to do anything about it.

    In reply to Cory
    April 28, 2012 at 3:16 a.m.
    Recommended5

    Jennifer
    Cambridge, MA

How the heck did he escape? Smells fishy to me.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
    Recommended5

    Brian
    NY

Blake, you proudly state you are "in New York." So am I. Contact the New York City Bar Association, The New York County Bar Association, The Bronx County Bar Association, etc.

They should be able to give you the names of licensed blind lawyers actively working here. I know I have met some, who do quite well thank you.

    In reply to Blake
    April 28, 2012 at 1:59 a.m.
    Recommended5

    sallerup
    Madison, AL

This person out of 1.5 billion people is the most importan person to the US. Give me a break.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
    Recommended5

    paul m
    boston ma

Welcome to the narcissistic Southern US money before human rights / environmental protection agenda - trade wars against South Africa promoted human rights there perfectly well , and its already , even in its infant stages, provoking Israel to reconsider its abuse of the Palestinians - the only reason it often fails is nations with poor human rights records as Saudia Arabia and China will support a nation otherwise under a Western trade embargo - I dont shop at anti American Walmart as a rule

    In reply to Todd
    April 27, 2012 at 11:41 p.m.
    Recommended5

    J. Tse
    Flushing, NY

In reply to David, the ones who exported the dirty manufacturing are the large corporations whom the average American has little control over. And for your information, the people who gladly took the job were the Chinese companies who run the factories (and guess who owns those companies). It takes two to tango my friend.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 9:36 p.m.
    Recommended5

    GRACE
    HINTERLANDS

A sighted man could not do what it is alledged that he has done. Surely he had assistance.

    In reply to zg
    April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
    Recommended5

    Something else
    Somewhere else

This just seems a cheap slam at the Chinese government. This guy didn't even have a Wikipedia article until January. Another one of these straw men propped up like the artist and the underage Tibetan monks.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended5

    junius
    Brutus

The NYTimes would do well to try and maintain some sense of balance by noting which of the "comments" are from Chinese computers or addresses, or which from obviously interested parties who are Chinese, whether citizens or spies,( how to tell the difference?) , residing outside of the "Middle Kingdom".
I have never seen so many comments on a single
article that were so reflective of a single mindset and propaganda line. It is as if this were a concerted effort by angry Chinese with computer connections to convince Americans and Times readers that millions of Chinese or foreign people prefer the Chinese dictatorship model of stable central government to obviously dangerous perils and madness of Western democracy.
It is not so difficult to identify from whom or from where comments originate , especially when so many sound exactly alike.
A little editorial effort here, please! At least put up an identifying notation somewhere, like "from University server in Peking." or "routed through servers in Russia or Ukraine or Africa.

    April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
    Recommended4

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

Tom Gong, I share your admiration for the amazing progress China has made, and I have no doubt that China will join the ranks of the world's democracies within my lifetime. Not as a consequence of revolution, but because that seems to be what seems to happen to countries once they have a large, educated middle class. In Asia, it's already happened in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, which were only nominally democratic at the start but grew into functioning democracies.

Bottom line, I'm extremely optimistic about the prospects for democracy in China, and believe that it will happen when the time is right.

    In reply to Josh Hill
    April 28, 2012 at 4:18 p.m.
    Recommended4

    Blake
    NYC

Well said. But the Chinese may be able to overthrow their government, while democratic government may be always controlled by elites.

    In reply to Josh Hill
    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended4

    CityBumpkin
    Earth

First, I know a lawyer who is legally blind. He is a prosecutor in Southern/Central California. His office has an assistant (college volunteer usually) who helps him with documents and also in navigating around. I found him to be a capable lawyer and an intelligent man, unlike some people with rather inane prejudices about individuals with disabilities.

Second, what part of not turning Chen over to the Chinese authorities prevents the US government from "take care of our business"? What business needs to be "taken care of" first before we can do the right thing?

The US government could stand to be better in many areas of foreign and domestic affairs. But doing the wrong thing here won't make anything better.

    In reply to Blake
    April 28, 2012 at 2:07 a.m.
    Recommended4

    J Stewart
    Boston

You hit the nail right on the head! There is a price we, as a nation, are paying (and will continue to pay) as long as we practice our current policies of "exceptionalism" when it comes to human rights and international law.
Personally, I would stand up and cheer if a more enlightened nation gave political asylum to an "escaped" Bradley Manning.

    In reply to Raphael
    April 28, 2012 at 1:58 a.m.
    Recommended4

    Byrd
    Orange County, CA

What a no-win situation for our current administration. Either they sacrifice a human rights activist, quite publicly, for political convenience; or, they insult our country's biggest debt holder. Good luck figuring this one out, State Department!

    April 28, 2012 at 2:08 a.m.
    Recommended4

    Jennie PC Chiang
    Boyertown, PA

From the article, Mr. Chen's right has been violated. Chinese authority should offer a rebuttal to Chen's accusations or give the reason for or cause of his, assumed facts, unlawful detention. So, media can make more logically sound comments. Yes, Chinese legal systems is not as sophisticated as we have here and I am sure that some Chinese citizens' right may be violated.

Yes, Chinese society is not perfect. A size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education.

The 13th amendment, which formally abolished slavery in the United States, passed the Senate on April 8, 1864, and the House on January 31, 1865. Fourteenth Amendment adopted 1868. American women could not vote until 1913 and we did not respect African-American human rights until or after 1968.

I am surprised that he is a self-taught lawyer, not a licensing lawyer, how could he admit to practice law or giving of legal advice, and representing such before courts.

CC: Chinese People Daily News.

    April 27, 2012 at 11:42 p.m.
    Recommended4

    blasmaic
    Washington DC

His antics by escaping his comfortable house arrest will harm others who will now not be trusted outside a maximum security setting. Although blind, he put his blindness to his advantage by escaping at night when he could navigate at an advantage.

    In reply to JW
    April 27, 2012 at 9:04 p.m.
    Recommended4

    Phoenix
    nyc

@ Eric...............exactly!!!!

    In reply to Eric Chang
    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended4

    AmatureHistorian
    NYC

Sounds like DOD, CIA have a hand in this. How was he able to coordinate transportation while under house arrest, evade three levels of guards, travel 8 hours on highway without being tracked by AI and walk pass security protecting the US embassy?

It is election year in the US and transition year in China. We can see the chess pieces but not the players.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended4

    JC
    SF

First Bo Xilai and then this Mr. Chen. There will be big change coming to China. The chinese communist party is totally disfunctional. I only hope that the change will not be violent. During Tang dynasty, there was the Chaos of An and Si.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended4

    S. Roy
    Toronto, Ontario

"human rights" in China. These words have no place in Chinese Government dictionary and they have said so a million times. When will the world realize that?

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
    Recommended4

    RobW
    Long Island, NY

How would china coming after him in our embassy be any different from the u.s. going into pakistani territory to get bin laden? (Not saying we were wrong, just saying in terms of each country's national interest)....

    April 28, 2012 at 5:35 p.m.
    Recommended3

    NW-China
    mainland of China

well, it can make chinese government look more ugly, and portrait us government as a hero, superman, some kind.
good for hollywood movies, see, i found one for you------commercial and entertainment value

    In reply to S. C.
    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended3

    Jennie PC Chiang
    Boyertown, PA

Answer to Miranda Right, NY at 7:58PM and SKC Los Alta at 8:04Mp,

I believe you if you can offer in proof of an alleged fact of journalists who has been harassed. Well, the article is based on one side of a cause and we should not make any judgment until we hear the other sides of story. It is the reason that I asked Chinese authority to offer a rebuttal to Chen's accusations or give the reason for or cause of his, assumed facts, unlawful detention.

China now society is like US in the past that serve as a real world example and a mirror for China. Again, as size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education. Mexico is another good example for China and Mexico is so called democratic society yet drug cartels massacre helpless women, children and innocent people almost every other week. Now you tell me what human right those innocent women and children have.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended3

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

J. Stewart, I can assure you that neither Norway nor the Netherlands would let a soldier who had disclosed classified information about their governments walk. Indeed, the United States is almost unique among the world's nations -- perhaps unique -- in its tolerance for whistelblowers. But whistelblowers are people who disclose illegalities or government wrongdoing. Manning did no such thing; his act was treason, pure and simple.

    In reply to phylum chordata
    April 28, 2012 at 3:06 a.m.
    Recommended3

    hunkerdown
    lancaster

Have you forgotten Hillary's courageous words to the Chinese at the women's conference a few years back?
Many people have begged, cajoled, railed against, tried to outfox, boycotted, been inspired by the courageous chinese dissidents for years. Remember the kid stopping the tanks at Tianamen Square? Remember the outpouring of grief at the massacre? Many people spoke out....
Am just waiting for Romney to prove that the average non-alzheimers US citizen has the short term memory of a snail....

    In reply to pj
    April 28, 2012 at 2:04 a.m.
    Recommended3

    Howie Lisnoff
    Massachusetts

Mr. Chen's possible presence in the American Embassy could be an opportunity for the US government to give a lesson in democracy and human rights in China? Isn't that what we stand for?

    April 28, 2012 at 2:07 a.m.
    Recommended3

    paul m
    boston ma

oh the China apologists bristle when Western press casts the slightest light upon the grotesque abuse and detentions of Chinese human rights activists- much of the Western media has cast a critical stance upon their pages of the prosecution of Assange who , though , has been afforded very posh accommodations in Britain among supporters , and , tellingly , has no interest in seeking asylum in China or Russia (etc) where he knows if he had uncovered priority files of the Chinese government he'd have been murdered either as a formal act of state or by proxies.

    In reply to phylum chordata
    April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
    Recommended3

    Blake
    NYC

If you really care about China, I would say that it would be a good idea to keep economic relations so that we will be able to exert pressure on China.

If you want to boycott Chinese products, say so directly. There is no need to use a flimsy excuse, and there is nothing wrong to say "buy American."

The thing is America has stopped producing many things for several decades. China happened to be the supplies in the past 15 years.

    In reply to sayitstr8
    April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
    Recommended3

    nstiver
    New Mexico

He probably had assistance with documents, from people he trusted. Or, perhaps advocacy of the kind he was doing does not require that much reading.

    In reply to Blake
    April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
    Recommended3

    Matt R.
    N.Y.C.

That or he was set free without knowing it so he could be 'justly' put to death after his 'recapture'

    In reply to AmatureHistorian
    April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
    Recommended3

    V
    CA

Cofi:
There is a marked difference between the debate over abortion in this country and the forced sterilization of thousands of women. The fact that we have a government that allows us to have a national debate (fight?) about the moral/political/personal issues surrounding abortion puts us light years beyond the abuse the Chinese government inflicts on their citizens.

    In reply to LG
    April 27, 2012 at 7:45 p.m.
    Recommended3

    AmatureHistorian
    NYC

The Vatican. Underground churches in China are doing the Vatican's bidding.

    In reply to Pierce Randall
    April 27, 2012 at 7:23 p.m.
    Recommended3

    Matt R.
    N.Y.C.

So his family has been beaten in the past because of him and he left them behind? Further many who helped him will suffer as well. He had better make more of this escape than to just negotiate his freedom.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
    Recommended3

    fairmount2010
    philadelphia, pa

how did he escape?

    April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
    Recommended3

    Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez
    Austin, Texas

Hmmmm

So.. he escaped house arrest... to live in hiding, in a house?

I do not think he is very smart.

    April 27, 2012 at 5:07 p.m.
    Recommended3

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

De facto espionage is not a political offense. No nation could or would ignore someone who disclosed its secrets.

    In reply to phylum chordata
    April 28, 2012 at 3:02 a.m.
    Recommended2

    Josh Hill
    New London
    Verified

Madupont, we are not Greece. The debt to China is denominated in dollars, for which reason there is no way the United States could default on it, even if our economy -- twice the size of China's -- couldn't pay the interest on the bonds, which it can, easily.

    In reply to pj
    April 28, 2012 at 3:00 a.m.
    Recommended2

    viviaibush
    florida

OK, Chinese society is not perfect. A size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education.

    April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
    Recommended2

    Disgusted
    Everywhere

Don't worry Mr. Chen. The U.S. will get some form of economic concession for G.E., GMC, Google or whoever are big business DNC supporters and you will be used as their pawn. We will be told that you decided to stay in the country you love and no one will here from you again...at least you won't see it coming.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
    Recommended2

    jdcremer
    Dallas, Texas

If we are involved I hope the word double agent is remembered. Chinese just do not let something like this happen or people are executed.

    April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
    Recommended2

    Ying Zu
    Columbus, OH

It is unclear to me whether he is licensed or not by the Chinese government, but apparently what he was doing is providing legal advice to others and showing as plaintiff in lawsuits against governmental agencies. According to the Chinese wiki page, he is referred to as a ``barefoot lawyer`` by the media, which implies he might not be a licensing lawyer.

    In reply to Jennie PC Chiang
    April 28, 2012 at 2:02 a.m.
    Recommended2

    wg
    CA

Are you blind? If not, take a look at the history of the Wikipedia entry "Chen Guangcheng"

    In reply to Something else
    April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
    Recommended2

    john
    hainan, china

imagine Bobby Seale in the Chinese embassy in Washington.. you think he's going anywhere?

    April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
    Recommended2

    madupont
    Lancaster

My goodness, didn't you bother to go see The Last Emperor ? Consequently, George Herbert Walker Bush came to town with his merry men because he was campaigning and there were loose ends to tie up as Abbie Hoffman first emerged from underground to do a water study on the Delaware River's nuclear power plants. He was dead within the month of April. Same symptoms as Marilyn Monroe. Yes, I know, we live in a perfect country with Democracy being refered to by GOP spinners as"Liberals" (a word that was otherwise out of fashion since the retirement of Adlai Stevenson).

    In reply to Jonathan
    April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
    Recommended2

    madupont
    Lancaster

Yes, I started reading his account in Rolling Stone, last night but only got two pages under my belt before I was asked to subscribe. Nowadays everybody asks that you subscribe, J.A, says that the guys come over from the Dept. of Justice and sit in the courtroom each day that he obviously attends.

    In reply to phylum chordata
    April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
    Recommended2

    madupont
    Lancaster

Thank you for being honest about this. Americans have been living in the dark for far too long.

    In reply to Gary McCray
    April 27, 2012 at 11:41 p.m.
    Recommended2


All
Comments Closed

        Simon Lutterbie
        USA

    How would you deal with this as an American or Chinese diplomat? Were I an American diplomat, here would be my approach:

    Deciding Mr. Chen's future is difficult but for me the choice is clear. Does China publicly acknowledge that they have held Mr. Chen without charges or trial? And do they publicly acknowledged that they continue to do so?

    I believe that everyone has the right to their own ideas and practices. But you must be prepared to defend them in the face of adversity. If you say or do something, stand by it.

    I do not support imprisonment without charge, and certainly not physical abuse. But if you are open about committing such acts, then at least we can hold a debate on those grounds. However, if you commit such acts and deny them, we have no basis for debate because I cannot trust your word.

    I do not return Mr. Chen without China acknowledging their treatment of him. But if they acknowledge that they held him without charge or trial and that they continue to do so? Then I return Mr. Chen because I am bound to respect their national sovereignty; but I do so with the full understanding that their sovereignty is based upon the confinement and abuse of individuals without trial.

    (continued in reply)
        April 29, 2012 at 4:16 a.m.
        blasmaic
        Washington DC

    His antics by escaping his comfortable house arrest will harm others who will now not be trusted outside a maximum security setting. Although blind, he put his blindness to his advantage by escaping at night when he could navigate in the darkness. Behind him he left his home with, as shown by the New York Times video, a television and at least one child. I agree that in America we don't put our dissidents under house arrest. That's America. Someone help me in understanding what the Chinese authorities could have done better within the context of their culture and system, other than acceeding to his every demand?
        April 29, 2012 at 4:15 a.m.
        trochilus
        Lambertville, NJ

    Above, commenter Josh Hill from New London says at 10:18 am, 04/28:
    . . .
    "Bottom line, I'm extremely optimistic about the prospects for democracy in China, and believe that it will happen when the time is right."

    So . . . according to you, the time must yet be wrong, Mr Hill?

    How so?

    Please tell us . . . exactly who are you to speak for the billions of people of China, over several generations, since the late 1940s, who have had to endure a complete lack of political freedom; who have suffered the imposition of centralization policies that have subjected millions upon millions of the Chinese people to slave labor conditions; and, as a result of which, many paid for such horrors with their lives?

    Bottom line, Mr. Hill, who are you?
        April 28, 2012 at 11:51 p.m.
        David Mcquire
        Washington

    Dissident Blind man escapes from Chinese security... Let me guess, the security detail was watching old Bruce Lee movies and are now facing execution for dereliction of duty!

    I'm thinking this is contrived on the part of the Chinese Government. If this guy was a real problem for the PRC he would have been in a high security lock up or in his grave by now. This guy is nothing more than a low value chip to be played by the government. As one commenter pointed out there is more advantage to getting this guy out of the country than there is keeping him around. Let's face it, if the PRC wants him dead they will take him out once he lands on US soil, they have done that before with exiles living in the states.

    Furthermore, this sort of theater plays to Obama's advantage as well. Both China and the Democrats in this country want Obama around for another four years. He's good for China after all. Need some good press to make you look presidential? Ask your friends in the China to help you out with that and badda boom dadda Beijing your wish is their command.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:50 p.m.
        rae_ekaf
        indiana

    Guess the Chinese aren't quite up to American security standards with a simple electronic ankle bracelet to keep track of those under house detention. This looks like a perfect opportunity for Obama and the American police state to sell the Chinese some American technology.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:49 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Daisy
        New York

    The NYTimes, Obama, etc. would consider Chen's escape from oppression to freedom a 'diplomatic quandary'.

    Let all decent people pray that Obama doesn't bow in obeisance to the Chinese and solve this patently obvious non quandary by returning the heroic Mr. Chen to his certain slaughter.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:49 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Vince
        New York

    He's in big trouble. Obama will throw anyone under the bus who threatens his power. An angry China is not good for Obama because they have such a financial hold on us. So, don't be surprised if Obama pulls an "Elian Gonzalez" on this guy.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Recommended1
        junius
        Brutus

    The NYTimes would do well to try and maintain some sense of balance by noting which of the "comments" are from Chinese computers or addresses, or which from obviously interested parties who are Chinese, whether citizens or spies,( how to tell the difference?) , residing outside of the "Middle Kingdom".
    I have never seen so many comments on a single
    article that were so reflective of a single mindset and propaganda line. It is as if this were a concerted effort by angry Chinese with computer connections to convince Americans and Times readers that millions of Chinese or foreign people prefer the Chinese dictatorship model of stable central government to obviously dangerous perils and madness of Western democracy.
    It is not so difficult to identify from whom or from where comments originate , especially when so many sound exactly alike.
    A little editorial effort here, please! At least put up an identifying notation somewhere, like "from University server in Peking." or "routed through servers in Russia or Ukraine or Africa.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Recommended4
        Ralph Chernoff
        Portland, OR

    From the article:
    Mr. Fu of China Aid said he was optimistic that Mr. Chen might be able to negotiate his
    freedom. "The fact that he's escaped will really shake up Chinese security forces," he said. "It tells them that they are not almighty God."

    Nor, so far as I'm aware, is the United States.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        M. Morris
        Connecticut

    Why not get Apple to threaten to move manufacturing out of China if they make a stink
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        wootendw
        Chandler, AZ

    This presents Obama with an excellent chance to reverse his recent slide in the polls. Just give Chen asylum, irking the Chinese government and he'll be seen as strong, good leader. But turn him over to Chinese authorities or simply let him sit at the embassy until after the election and Obama will drop faster than ever.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Tim McCardel
        North Carolina

    Obama's Elian moment.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Judyw
        Cumberland, MD

    I wish we sould stop being the country that every troublemaking dissident heads to. We really should not be so welcoming to dissidents as we often don't know their true aims and they end causing trouble in diplomatic relations. I think we should let their own country deal with them. Dissidents are troublemakers whereever they live and whereve they go.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Recommended1
        junius
        Brutus

    re:Challenge for U.S. After Escape by China Activist
    I think the greatest challenge is Mr. Chen's. On the one hand, he insists he does not want to leave China. Yet he is now taking full advantage of the presence of the US embassy and laws of soverignty, while placing many Americans in peril of Chinese reprisals. There is little doubt he is being treated somewhat better there then in his previous confinement, but what is the end he wishes? What does he expect to obtain from the despised Western foreigners? He claims to want no more then to be recognized as a "regular guy" sort of Chinese citizen. I expect that he probably hates and resents the USA and despises us for our inferior personal and business characteristics, as we obviously treat Chinese with contempt,(remember the Opium wars! So what if that was Britain-English,America all same!) and probably our lack of Chinese culture. So how can we help him?
    He is probably a nationalist and a good Han racist, just like the billions of Chinese he wants to live like and imitate.
    Why, then, are we giving him a lift up out of the gutter that he so ardently desires to submerge himself in and become a part of?
    There are soo-o-o many other worthwhile people to whom we can extend the hand of friendship. I see no reason to do so for a man who openly dismisses the West and its efforts to aid China in creating a civil society.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        muhammed atta
        Dhahran

    Mr Chen is one of the world's most outspoken champion of rights for LGBT people in China. I hope Mr Obama will ensure his safe passage so that he can continue this essential work for the equal treatment of human beings.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Recommended1
        achana
        Wilmington, DE

    Much as I find aspects of China's rise encouraging, there are also fundamental issues that I cannot understand.

    Why is China so desperately afraid of socalled dissidents. So people have a different opinion and they are not afraid to voice their them. Big deal, happens day in day, out in, every where in the West.

    And if China doesn't want these dissidents, so let them emigrate to USofA or Canada. Why put them under house arrest? It's not as if they can communicate with other mainland Chinese over the internet given the censorship in place.

    The CCP is not afraid of utterly corrupt high ranking CCP officials amassing vast fortunes on the back of Chinese people and sending their sons and daughters to study in USofA but the CCP is afraid of a blind man talking.

    What is the CCP so desperately, desperately afraid of?
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Blake
        NYC

    China's human rights record is very much like a glass of water, which is half full or half empty. If Mr. Chen had done one tenth of what he did during Mao's era, he might have been sentenced to death. China already made huge progress, partly because of efforts made by persons like Chen. For example, while traveling in Beijing, he refused to pay in public transportation. The local operator said he did not have a local permit. He sued and won, because a law by the central government did give the handicapped free ride. I do not know if America let such people enjoy such privilege, or if local governments have the right not to obey the law of the central government.

    Western media is unwilling and unable to know the details and subtleties and difficulties of China. It is unwilling because it tries to serve its own interest and tarnishing China's reputation does just that. It is unable because most reporters do not know the local language, history and culture well. All they see is black and white. They lack the capability of finding more relevant issues to the vast majority of the Chinese but focus on sensational stories that are related to a small group of dissidents, many of them created by the media.

    Do not get me wrong. Western media does push China in the right direction.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Recommended1
        patient advocagte
        new york ny

    And so now a handful of American Christian rabid anti-abortion fanatics are going to wreck the U.S. government's efforts to manage relations with the world's largest and potentially most dangerous country? This borders on treason.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Ray
        California

    How many people do we have in prison that should not be there maybe Bradley Manning could escape and to the Chinese Embassy
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Gene
        Atlanta, GA

    Don't expect the Obama administration to back Mr. Chen. They want a deal with China to refute Republican challenges of a failure to address the trade and exchange issues. Will politics trump rights?
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Donald Surr
        Pennsylvania

    With all due respect to this Chinese gentleman, the purpose of our embassies is to encourage mutually profitable trade and peaceful relations with the governments of the host countries. It is NOT to interfere in the domestic affairs of those host countries or to provide sanctuary for those not in political favor.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:48 p.m.
        Charles
        Washington State

    The Chinese Peril and their total lack of morals and fair legal practices which are not some Bynzantium mess from the middle ages! I have been spied on by this country as a result of working their (project work on a plant) for 14 yars since I lef and I helped these people! This is how they repay even foreigner's who fall into their spy web accidentally! Fie! China, you crooked snakes get a life besides spying on everbody!
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Rudi
        Canada

    It is significant for today's "Realpolitik" that there is even a discussion on the US having to think about options. China has invaded North America surreptitiously and is undermining the convictions of our politicians. Our Prime Minister Harper is cowardly hiding behind closed doors for a short, furtive meeting with the Dalai Lama so as not to hurt China's feelings.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        matt b
        Sydney Australia

    " The US embassy is the only free place in China right now," said BeiFeng, a Hong Kong based activist commenting on the possible hiding place of escaped Chinese dissenter Chen Guangcheng.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        matt b
        Sydney Australia

    " The US embassy is the only free place in China right now," said BeiFeng, a Hong Kong based activist commenting on the possible hiding place of escaped Chinese dissenter Chen Guangcheng.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Future Man
        China

    I do wish the U.S. government would give asylum to Mr. Chen. In fact, I wish the U.S. would give asylum to ALL the activists in China. China will be a lot better without them.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        chinese
        hell

    as a chinese, thank you the U.S. government.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        R. G. Cope
        Melbourne Australia

    The outcome for Mr. Chen will pit US-style democratic and free-expression ideals against the needs of the economically, 'capitalistic-communistic' (often individual surpressing) state. While this is a crunch time for US-China diplomacy, it is a time for fundamental values to surface. There need be no backing down in the fullest support of this brave man.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Michael Manning
        Oakland, CA

    A roughly translated full transcript of Chen Guangcheng's escape video has been posted at http://china.notspecial.org/archives/2012/04/full_transcript.html

    Very rarely are the powers that be taken to task in China. This is true hero stuff, people!
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Ramon
        San Francisco, CA

    I'm not some flag-waving my-country-right-or-wrong type, but this is an opportunity for the United States to stand up to the guaranteed typical remonstrance that China will launch.
        April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Recommended1
        RobW
        Long Island, NY

    How would china coming after him in our embassy be any different from the u.s. going into pakistani territory to get bin laden? (Not saying we were wrong, just saying in terms of each country's national interest)....
        April 28, 2012 at 5:35 p.m.
        Recommended3
        Fiber Laser
        Ottawa

    Mr. Chen is a hero, to me, and to many common Chinese.

    But you see, Mr. Chen is not prosecuted by Mr. Bo Xilai, the purged communist party red star in Chongqing whose wife murder a British businessman.

    Many Chinese, and many Westerner, deem the red star Bo XIlai a devil, premier Wen Jiabao a worthy man, president Hu Jintao an trustworthy man. But to me, or to many Chinese with deeper comprehension of communist party, they are the same.

    The news say that, the Briton was killed by Bo, many Chongqing businessman and layers were imprisoned by Bo, trillion dollars was pillaged by Bo, "red song campaign" was aroused by Bo.

    But many Chinese know: Mr. Chen Guangcheng a layer in Shandong province , was not prosecuted by Bo in Chongqing; Mr. Qian a village head in Zhejiang province, was killed by local government head instead of Bo in Chongqing; no evidence is presented that Mr. Bo Xilai is corrupt while premier Wen Jiabao and president Hu Jintao are clean; it's President Hu Jintao instead of Bo XIlai said that North Korea is always correct in politic.

    In Chinese rumor, each top Chinese politic family runs a "big business". Premier Wen's family is the top of these tops.

    Now you know, why many Chinese sympathize Bo Xilai's downfall------ he is not the dirtiest in communist party, perhaps a relatively cleaner boss,.
        April 28, 2012 at 5:35 p.m.
        Recommended5
        keefie
        .co

    I want to be proud to be an american. I expect the President to put the interests of Mr. Chen, his family, and his helpers first. This will require doing a deal with the government of PRC, on that basis. Quite apart from the ethics of the matter, I hope that the President will consider the effect in this country if he hands Mr. Chen back.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended17
        Zhaolu Song
        Bellevue, WA

    If the story is true, this in fact might be the best scenario the Chinese gov't can hope for. What the govt is afraid of is Mr. Chen's influence among the Chinese people. That's why they confined him so he could not interact with others. Now if he comes to the us (Chinese govt would be happy to let this happen) he will lose his ability yo make any real impact to China. Two decades ago, many student leaders fled China after tiananmen square. How many people in China today still remember their names?
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended20
            Mainland Chinese
            Shanghai

        Chen has sacrificed so much and suffered so much. He deserves the freedom and human rights he is entitled to if he he is granted asylum in the U.S., even that means the vast Chinese people will lose a fighter for their rights.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
            Recommended1
        Mainland Chinese
        Shanghai

    Last night a Chinese micro-blog said Chen had boarded a flight to the U.S.

    If that's true, I thank you, the U.S. government. You absolutely did the right thing, again.

    I have to agree, the Chinese government is absolutely goons and thugs. I am so glad we have heroes like Chen, who gives us some hope in the darkness.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended25
        Chinese
        China Beijing

    Using your mind, true or false is a question! I could hardly believe this news. Everything has two sides, even for a country. I have to admit that there are some severe problems in china, there's also inspiring change in China. For the one child problem that mentioned above, it is the only choice for China to control the enormous population. Though it's might unbelievable for foreigners who have religions. The culture diversely different in some countries. To show more respect to other people other countries other culture is the sprits of Beijing, I am really proud of my city and my country, and respect yours. Hope you have the same sprits with me.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended18
        blackmamba
        IL

    Both the People's Republic of China and the United States of America have their own national interests and values which may or may not coincide. And those values differ on the domestic and the foreign fronts.

    America must realize that whatever it does becomes a floor and justification for any other nation doing like wise. America leads the world in the number of it's citizens who are incarcerated in prison or involved in some stage of the criminal justice system. Pointing out that the vast majority of them are poor black and brown conflicts with America's posture as a nation of laws with freedom and liberty where all are treated equally. Poverty is rampant in America and income inequality is at record levels. Millions of Americans have no access to quality affordable health care.

    Imagine that this situation was reversed. What would America expect or want from China?

    China has already learned that it can invade and occupy nations anywhere in the world in a preemptive strike. China has also learned that it can kidnap, torture, and indefinititely detain it's enemies. China has learned that it can kill any of it's citizens without judicial or due process of any knd.

    This is always about American values and interests. It does not matter how bad or hypocritical other nations may be in any situation. If we both act in the same manner then this only about power and self interest.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended12
        Judy
        Los Angeles

    China's persistent intimidation with unjustified convictions and unlawful home detention of dissidents advocating human rights, clearly signals its determination to retain its power to control by the rule of rulers.
    The previous comment equates America with the dollar . Is our Constitution really a dinosaur? President Obama, Mr Chen is the Voice of Democracy . Validate it and our nation.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended9
            ilwacojack
            Pacific Northwest

        This is bigger than Obama. He cannot stop flights to freedom. But nor will he accept a fight for it.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
            Recommended1
        AlexDeng
        NYC

    The US Admin has been using human rights issue (and among other things) as bargaining chips to deter China in a political brinksmanship. The US Admin determines to re-enter Pacific Asia rim to contain the rising Chinese influence. The US Admin likes to use these issues as pinch lines in publicity stints. All the activities are just pawns in the game. Wang Lijun, who sought refuge at the US Embassy, once described himself as being a chewing gum (that could be easily spit out once it has served its purpose). He is an intelligent person who has recognized the evils in all politicians early on.
    By escaping to the US Embassys, both Chen Guangcheng and Wang Lijun have succeeded in raising their case profiles to an international level, and thus forcing both the Chinese and the US Admin to deal with their cases openly.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended8
        Charles
        Clifton, NJ

    Great reporting by Andrew Jacobs, and it shows the disturbing relationship that we have with China. With the old Russia (or the "Soviet Union", as some clueless Romney aides still call it) the relationship was clear. We give asylum to their dissidents.

    But the Right Wing Christian Capitalist element here has to to choose between capitalist profits that depend on the cheap goods from Chinese Communist atheists and the Christian teachings of our democracy. They choose the profits. So the US has a problem in dealing with China. No politician, Democrat or Republican, in this country has any solid strategy to deal with China because voters love those cheap goods, and our executives and investors make enhanced profits from them.

    It should be simple: We cannot trust the Chinese government. But instead we are in a very precarious dance with this strange bed-fellow. One theory is that democracy cannot last. It may well be that the Chinese brand of "communist capitalism" will be the new power. It produces the wealth that people want, relegating human rights to be an insignificant ideal of the few.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended10
            junius
            Brutus

        Boy is this stupid. You don't see the US government arresting, beating and imprisoning US citizens for castigating government policies. American government may be awful and dumb, but it is all pretty much in the hands of voters, as ignorant and blind to their own interests as they may be.
        No. It is China that walks the razor of political instability! Incompletely reformed fascist/communist dictatorship nations like China, Russia and it's former clints as well as Islamic or other theocracies, must control the press, TV, radio and internet to maintain an image of "one country, one thought." Any wonder they get along with North Korea so well?
        They are a still like Nazi era Germany or Soviet era Russia both of which obtained power by crushing internal dissent.
        When China is a smoking heap of rubble and billions have died by each others hands in their next revolution(s), the USA will still be here, along with Australia-New Zealand, Europe and Canada and even Latin America in some form.
        It is the West that will always survive in some free democratic and or republican form. China is doomed by its own internal contradictions.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
            Recommended1
        Alexander K.
        Minnesota

    Sounds like Mr. Chen is Nobel Peace Prize material. I hope our Nobel Prize winning president will prove he was worthy and stand up for what it right.

    In fact, wouldn't it be great to live in a country that always stands up for the principles laid out in its constitution instead of playing political games? This wouldn't be so difficult if we were a real democracy, rather than a plutocracy looking out for the moneyed interests (Apple, Wal-Mart, etc.).
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended12
            Ray
            California

        maybe he can stand next to Bradley Manning and Julian Asange when he receives the prize
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Jennie PC Chiang
        Boyertown, PA

    Answer to Miranda Right, NY at 7:58PM and SKC Los Alta at 8:04Mp,

    I believe you if you can offer in proof of an alleged fact of journalists who has been harassed. Well, the article is based on one side of a cause and we should not make any judgment until we hear the other sides of story. It is the reason that I asked Chinese authority to offer a rebuttal to Chen's accusations or give the reason for or cause of his, assumed facts, unlawful detention.

    China now society is like US in the past that serve as a real world example and a mirror for China. Again, as size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education. Mexico is another good example for China and Mexico is so called democratic society yet drug cartels massacre helpless women, children and innocent people almost every other week. Now you tell me what human right those innocent women and children have.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended3
            AlexDeng
            NYC

        I don't think you can talk sensibly with the Chinese govt on these sensitive issue of human rights etc. Take Ai Weiwei's case as an example. He was charged with tax avasion in a closed court w/o the presence of his lawyers. The tax authority would not even show proof of any tax paper work to his lawyers. Take Liu Xiaobo's case as an example. He was charged with subversion of state power when he was just exercising his constitution rights. The Chinese govt is only concerned about their own interests in ruling the nation not the people.
        The legal system in China only exists on paper. The court rooms are just front show cases while judgements are negotiated behind closed doors. The Chinese govt is corrupt to its core. That's why they are spending so much money on internal security to suppress people. That's why so many of well off Chinese (including officials) are sending their families (and along with their ill-gotten money) to overseas countries as insurance. That's why casinos in Macau are seeing big revenus (as casinos are used for money laundering).
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
            Recommended1
            Jeff
            L.A.

        India is projected to pass China in population. India has a functioning democracy.

        The only thing I get from your post is that the collective and their corrupt version of the social order, defined from the top, is more important than the individual.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        viviaibush
        florida

    OK, Chinese society is not perfect. A size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education.
        April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Recommended2
        Josh Hill
        New London
        Verified

    Those who are attempting to portray an equivalence between the human rights record of the American and Chinese governments should try this little experiment. Go to Times Square, and unfurl a banner that says "Down with the American government." See what happens. Then, make a banner that says "Down with the Chinese government," and try unfurling it in Tiananmen Square.

    Please note that the experiment does not work the other way around.
        April 28, 2012 at 3:32 a.m.
        Recommended38

    Read All 4 Replies
            Tom Gong
            China

        I admit what you are saying is the fact. But please be aware of the fact that it took hundreds of years for America to be like this. For China, it is only for a few decades. The progress China has made in economy and politics are indeed "radical" from many aspects.

        Also it is wrong that you say "do you have any idea what it's like to live in China? Try asking a Tibetan." The Tibetan you can ask is probably those who are being exiled from China. For sure, their words are against China. I am not excusing for my country. I admit there is still a lot to do for us. But I hope more westerners can indeed go to China on their own, you will find quite amazingly....wow, I can go to almost anywhere I want. wow, it is not a country I presumed that is full of oppression. People here do have freedom.

        The report of western media is more often than not only a facet of the real China. It's like watching China through a steorotyped glasses. No wonder there is a prevalent discontent to China.

        More Mr.Chens are emerging, the government is making constant compromise and pushing this country forward.

        Just please explore the real China. Asking the Tibetans is far less enough to know the real situation and gain an all-round perspective on China.
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
            Recommended16
            Steve
            Austin

        The argument that the United States is at least better than China is stale. Educate yourself with the NDAA along with DHS wire tapping.

        "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
            Recommended9
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        Tom Gong, I share your admiration for the amazing progress China has made, and I have no doubt that China will join the ranks of the world's democracies within my lifetime. Not as a consequence of revolution, but because that seems to be what seems to happen to countries once they have a large, educated middle class. In Asia, it's already happened in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, which were only nominally democratic at the start but grew into functioning democracies.

        Bottom line, I'm extremely optimistic about the prospects for democracy in China, and believe that it will happen when the time is right.
            April 28, 2012 at 4:18 p.m.
            Recommended4
        Disgusted
        Everywhere

    Don't worry Mr. Chen. The U.S. will get some form of economic concession for G.E., GMC, Google or whoever are big business DNC supporters and you will be used as their pawn. We will be told that you decided to stay in the country you love and no one will here from you again...at least you won't see it coming.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
        Recommended2
        harry
        michigan

    So how do people expect the Chinese to enforce the one child rule? Ask people kindly to only have one child? It is in China's interest to control their population and its none of our business. . I have zero love for the PRC but on this issue I could care less.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
        Recommended6
        Jennifer
        Cambridge, MA

    How the heck did he escape? Smells fishy to me.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:55 a.m.
        Recommended5
        Jeff Stockwell
        Atlanta, GA

    This incident is a reminder of what kind of China is rising. The legal system is suppose to be a system of justice. Where those who commit true crimes and those who have wrong others face justice. The legal system should be independent from the government, influential groups, and individuals. The law should be impartial available. The case of Mr. Chen and others has provided a window into China's legal system. The legal system in China is controlled by government officials, prosecutors, and police who can trump up charges and order thugs to do their dirty work. This kind of China is not good for the Chinese people and it is not good for the International Community. Though China is making great strides and realizing manny achievements, they are a dark cloud on the horizon.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:13 a.m.
        Recommended16
        Stephen
        Shanghai

    While I agree that the US must provide asylum to Chen Guangcheng, his family and helpers, I have questions for those who want to boycott Chinese-made goods. Are you enabling the dictators in Beijing or are you helping the good Chinese people? If you want to burn flags, do not burn Chinese flags, especially the flag of the ROC, just burn the flag of the CCP. For if your justified anger against oppression turns to racial hatred against all Chinese, you become no different from the CCP.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:12 a.m.
        Recommended7
        S. C.
        Mclean, VA

    Anyone believes the story of a blind man able to escape cordon of security force must be the biggest oxymoron on earth. Obviously, China intentionally let this blind man go just to bring a needless distraction to a closure. Now, the ball is on our Court. We have to be preoccupied by this man for a long time - a man has no intelligence value or value of any kind to us whatsoever.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:12 a.m.
        Recommended8
            NW-China
            mainland of China

        well, it can make chinese government look more ugly, and portrait us government as a hero, superman, some kind.
        good for hollywood movies, see, i found one for you------commercial and entertainment value
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
            Recommended3
        CityBumpkin
        Earth

    The US government does need to clean up its own act in many areas, but doing the wrong thing here won't make anything better.

    Don't turn Chen over.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
        Recommended10
        Trevor
        Diaz

    I only hope and wish Dalai Lama can go back to his Potala Palace after the colapse of this communist regime followed by total disintegration of China like the Soviets soon after the fall of Berlin Wall.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
        Recommended13
        jdcremer
        Dallas, Texas

    If we are involved I hope the word double agent is remembered. Chinese just do not let something like this happen or people are executed.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:11 a.m.
        Recommended2
        90210
        Texas

    "Nope, he didn't come through here" says the Embassy (as a G550 lands in Anchorage for a refueling stop, with Mr. Chen inside).
        April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
        john
        hainan, china

    imagine Bobby Seale in the Chinese embassy in Washington.. you think he's going anywhere?
        April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
        Recommended2
        rlk
        chappaqua, ny

    This may be a diplomatic dilemma. It is not, under any circumstances, a moral dilemma.

    In terms of human rights it's a glaringly clear decision.

    Support him and grant him asylum.

    It's the only right and moral path.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
        Recommended16
        sallerup
        Madison, AL

    This person out of 1.5 billion people is the most importan person to the US. Give me a break.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
        Recommended5
        Binkky
        In Canada

    The States is in no position to point the finger of condemnation for human rights abuse at anyone else. Glasses houses and all. Gitmo and all. People dying in immigration jails; Drones, Secret and Public Assassinations, Imprisonment forever without charge or access to representation. Total information awareness. Wise up.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:10 a.m.
        Recommended9
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        You have got to be kidding.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:49 a.m.
            Recommended12
            Citizen
            RI

        Josh, Binkky is most certainly *not* kidding, and if you had been paying attention over the past years you would know that was is said is true. We tend to think of these situations as isolated incidents, but in fact there is a continuous process of rights erosion in the US, predicated on "the war on terror" and "the war on drugs."

        I am not equating the US with China, nor do I think Binkky is either. But facts are facts, and everything Binkky said has happened and is happening, but is all excused in one fashion or another. In the end our hands are *not* clean in the human rights arena, though they are not as dirty as China's.

        Everyone must understand that it is okay to criticize our government when it acts opposite to the ideals of rights and liberties enshrined in our Constitution. To do so doesn't make one a bad citizen, it makes one a good citizen. If we can't conduct honest self-evaluation we are no better than the worst rights offenders, and have no business calling ourselves a free country.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Butler Chen
        oversee

    Chen guang cheng is one of most brave man in China who inspires unaccountable Chinese pursuing democracy and freedom in China. Because someone like chen guang cheng, I never ever lose hope for the people living in my country ,China. And one day , my generation ,the many generation after us could live in a country which embraces freedom and democracy.
    Let 's cross the fingers for chen guangcheng and his family.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:09 a.m.
        Recommended22
        Richard
        Los Angeles

    How many more examples do we Americans need before we stop shipping our jobs to China? Every Apple iPad you buy is underwriting this corrupt regime.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:09 a.m.
        Recommended7
            Tp
            Maine

        Economic sanctions only hurt the people we want to help. The State Department stepping in to offer asylum is the way to go here. Are you wearing clothes right now, or making coffee? Chances are Chinese labor was involved.
        And by the way, I am sending this from my iPad.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
            AMR
            Orange County, CA

        You think Chinese would be better off if their GDP came to a screeching hault?

        I am all for safety and proper oversight of factories, but as you can see from the Chinese posting here they are proud of their country and their progress toward democracy and freedom. Helping Mr. Chen and his family is a good way to help China see their mistakes and move forward--boycotting Apple/Chinese industry is not.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Bill Wilde
        NJ

    Of course our government should protect this hero. There is nothing to debate here, returning Mr. Chen to chinese communist tyrants would be unconscionable.
        April 28, 2012 at 2:08 a.m.
        Recommended6
        Byrd
        Orange County, CA

    What a no-win situation for our current administration. Either they sacrifice a human rights activist, quite publicly, for political convenience; or, they insult our country's biggest debt holder. Good luck figuring this one out, State Department!
        April 28, 2012 at 2:08 a.m.
        Recommended4
            W.A. Spitzer
            Faywood, New Mexico

        Or perhaps the Chinese government wanted a way to get him out of the country and let him "escape" to a U.S. consulate. He doesn't bother them anymore and they can blame us for interfering in Chinese affairs.
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
            Recommended1
        Howie Lisnoff
        Massachusetts

    Mr. Chen's possible presence in the American Embassy could be an opportunity for the US government to give a lesson in democracy and human rights in China? Isn't that what we stand for?
        April 28, 2012 at 2:07 a.m.
        Recommended3
        DanBal
        Paris

    If this dissident really is in the U.S. embassy in Beijing, then President Obama can prove he is not just the cynical pol he's been playing for the past three years. If he throws Chen under the bus and hands him over to the Chinese authorities, he has forfeited any moral authority he has left.
        April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
        Recommended33
            Jim
            Dallas

        What would the French know about human rights?
            April 28, 2012 at 1:57 a.m.
            Recommended1
            Brian
            NY

        Well, I guess we're getting the "fair and balanced" view here.

        President Obama has actually restored a measure of moral authority to our Presidency. Not nearly enough, seeing that it was totally stripped away and might even be said to have gone into a negative position under President Bush, et.al. In fact, I don't foresee a full measure of moral authority in the Presidency until Bush, Cheney, etc. are put on trial for war crimes.

        I hope Obama can find a way to help Mr. Chen and his friends and family without causing major hurt to more innocents. Chen certainly deserves it. I am much more confident he can do it than I ever could have been with Bush.
            April 28, 2012 at 1:58 a.m.
            Recommended6
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        Obama has his flaws, but being a "cynical pol" isn't one of them.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:51 a.m.
            Recommended6
        Raphael
        Florida

    Please,give some thought before reacting. Remember that if you point a finger at China, 3 fingers are pointing back. We, the U.S., still have a long way to go to earase racism, corruption, home grown killings with too many hand guns, and a growing reputation of being too much of a bully in the world. China has come a long way since the 1949 revolution, and still has a long way to go, but the times are a changing fast. I love our U.S., and the many good things we do in the world, and hope we will continue to be good for goodness sake, and get our troops back home out of harms way. Thanks,
        April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
        Recommended16

    Read All 4 Replies
            Miranda Right
            New York

        Generally we frown upon police brutality here. We also report on it, comment on it, have the ability to search the internet for it without it being deleted by government watchdogs. That distinguishing peculiarity called 'Freedom of Press' is what allows us to continue to make progress. And for the record I have lived in China. Have you?
            April 28, 2012 at 1:59 a.m.
            Recommended14
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        Good God, do you have any idea what it's like to live in China? Try asking a Tibetan.

        I'm really getting fed up with this kind of unthinking anti-Americanism. How do you think the United States ranks compared to other countries on corruption? (You'd apparently be surprised.) Racism? (Again, you'd be surprised -- though if you asked yourself how many other majority white countries have elected black leaders, you could answer your own question.)

        As to being a bully in the world, who would you suggest as a more generous great power? There is none even remotely comparable in history.

        The United States has its flaws, yes, but comparing this country to an authoritarian state like China is beyond the pale.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:56 a.m.
            Recommended20
            Jeff
            L.A.

        Go ahead and grind your ax. Thanks to the U.S. Navy you will never have a Chinese jack boot on your neck like Tibet. China is a plague that corrupts everything it touches. Look how they trashed the Nobel Prize when a Chinese dissident won the award. Values and ideals even in the abstract do matter.
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Jennie PC Chiang
        Boyertown, PA

    From the article, Mr. Chen's right has been violated. Chinese authority should offer a rebuttal to Chen's accusations or give the reason for or cause of his, assumed facts, unlawful detention. So, media can make more logically sound comments. Yes, Chinese legal systems is not as sophisticated as we have here and I am sure that some Chinese citizens' right may be violated.

    Yes, Chinese society is not perfect. A size of China, it just can not be changed over night as an uneven distribution of the level of an education. Human right or democracy is closely associated with properly governmental function, such as soundly constitution and legal systems impose in interests of community as well as the even distribution of a level of the education.

    The 13th amendment, which formally abolished slavery in the United States, passed the Senate on April 8, 1864, and the House on January 31, 1865. Fourteenth Amendment adopted 1868. American women could not vote until 1913 and we did not respect African-American human rights until or after 1968.

    I am surprised that he is a self-taught lawyer, not a licensing lawyer, how could he admit to practice law or giving of legal advice, and representing such before courts.

    CC: Chinese People Daily News.
        April 27, 2012 at 11:42 p.m.
        Recommended4

    Read All 5 Replies
            Ying Zu
            Columbus, OH

        It is unclear to me whether he is licensed or not by the Chinese government, but apparently what he was doing is providing legal advice to others and showing as plaintiff in lawsuits against governmental agencies. According to the Chinese wiki page, he is referred to as a ``barefoot lawyer`` by the media, which implies he might not be a licensing lawyer.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:02 a.m.
            Recommended2
            SKC
            Los Altos

        The issue is not the "imperfection" of the legal system in mainland China but the total lack of accountability of it, and the persecution of dissidents. It is the kind of things that the CCP exploited brilliantly during the civil war against the KMT government. I don't believe the people would have supported the CCP against the KMT during the civil war had they known the replacement would have been by today's system under the CCP.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:04 a.m.
            Recommended6
            Mark
            USA

        Well, in China, doctors and lawyers don't have monopoly like in the U.S., so anyone is free to give medical or legal advice, whether licensed or not. It's how some of the traditional doctors can continue to practice.
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
        Miranda Right
        New York

    I heard the woman who helped him flee has already been arrested. God help her.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:59 p.m.
        Recommended29
        M. Paire
        NYC

    His family was beaten and punished, and for what? Being genetically linked? This kind of draconian behavior is outrageous, unacceptable, and should be condemned. If the Communist party has any moral conscience at all, they will discipline the police who handled this like a bunch of triad gangsters rather than protectors of the citizens.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:58 p.m.
        Recommended31
        pj
        buffalo ny

    Shame on the united states for repeatedly failing to call china out on their horrible record of human rights abuses for decades. Turning a blind eye because of money and energy policy. Good for Mr Chen for having more courage and more humanity than everyone in the world governments put together. his entire family and any friends who may have placed themselves in danger by helping him should be given asylum in the US, Great Britain and any other country who thinks of itself as remotely humane. This draconian evil empire needs to be stopped in it's tracks - money and energy should be no excuse for doing what's right.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:58 p.m.
        Recommended10
            madupont
            Lancaster

        Do you forget that you are profoundly in debt to the PRC, have nothing with which to recompense them unless they want to take slave labor from the population that Romney and GOP plan to reduce to lower/lesser level of American citizenship. This goes right back to the deal Nixon and Kissinger made and the Bush family borrowed on. See if the Party lives up to their Republican standards as Romney thinks he knows better than Huntsman for instance.
            April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
            Recommended6
            hunkerdown
            lancaster

        Have you forgotten Hillary's courageous words to the Chinese at the women's conference a few years back?
        Many people have begged, cajoled, railed against, tried to outfox, boycotted, been inspired by the courageous chinese dissidents for years. Remember the kid stopping the tanks at Tianamen Square? Remember the outpouring of grief at the massacre? Many people spoke out....
        Am just waiting for Romney to prove that the average non-alzheimers US citizen has the short term memory of a snail....
            April 28, 2012 at 2:04 a.m.
            Recommended3
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        Madupont, we are not Greece. The debt to China is denominated in dollars, for which reason there is no way the United States could default on it, even if our economy -- twice the size of China's -- couldn't pay the interest on the bonds, which it can, easily.
            April 28, 2012 at 3:00 a.m.
            Recommended2
        Hypatia
        Santa Monica CA

    Hmmm...wonder if the Chinese guards were instructed to not only look away, but actually help Chen "escape..."his "heavily-guarded" place of detention.

    Maybe the regime decided it's better for them to pass the problem to the Americans, assume an aggrieved posture, and not have to take heat about this brave man any more.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:53 p.m.
        Recommended7
        Gary McCray
        Fort Bragg CA

    If Obama sends this guy back he will lose my vote and I would rather be dead than see Romney president.

    Just a thought Mr. President, while your contemplating this.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:52 p.m.
        Recommended17
            J Stewart
            Boston

        Please don't become one of those who don't vote! For every single person who doesn't vote, the opposition makes a gain equivalent of 2 votes. It is to this end that some states are making it harder for targetted groups to vote, or to discourage others from voting with their multi-million dollar media buys. To not vote is to give teeth to the monster unleashed by "Citizens United".
            April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
            Recommended6
        Gary McCray
        Fort Bragg CA

    China's government has greatly improved the standard of living for most Chinese.

    But they have never been considerate of dissent and their human rights abuses are a travesty for a major government.

    Unfortunately in spite of much crowd delivered rhetoric to the contrary, the people who comprise the current Chinese government suffer from the same self serving and power hungry greed that in many ways is sabotaging our own government.

    Corporations or Governments, people are week and prone to take care of themselves at the expense of any altruism.

    And the worst tend to float to the top.
        April 27, 2012 at 10:37 p.m.
        Recommended9
            madupont
            Lancaster

        Thank you for being honest about this. Americans have been living in the dark for far too long.
            April 27, 2012 at 11:41 p.m.
            Recommended2
        phylum chordata
        earth

    Maybe Mr. Assange will seek relief at the Chinese embassy in London. Anyone who thinks he's not a political prisoner is dreaming.
        April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
        Recommended16

    Read All 7 Replies
            J Stewart
            Boston

        The idea is dead-on, but it would have to be a country that could withstand scrutiny of its human rights record... something which, sadly, no longer can be said of the United States OR China.
        I would actually like to see Bradley Manning slip his guards and be granted asylum by Norway, the Netherlands, or some other more enlightened society.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        De facto espionage is not a political offense. No nation could or would ignore someone who disclosed its secrets.
            April 28, 2012 at 3:02 a.m.
            Recommended2
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        J. Stewart, I can assure you that neither Norway nor the Netherlands would let a soldier who had disclosed classified information about their governments walk. Indeed, the United States is almost unique among the world's nations -- perhaps unique -- in its tolerance for whistelblowers. But whistelblowers are people who disclose illegalities or government wrongdoing. Manning did no such thing; his act was treason, pure and simple.
            April 28, 2012 at 3:06 a.m.
            Recommended3
        Blackwater
        Seattle

    There is no question: the American authorities need to get Chen safely out of China. Sadly, I think his wife and some of his remaining family are as good as dead, regardless of what happens to Mr Chen. His voice is the one that needs to survive, to tell his story to the world, and to common Chinese.

    If Chen is released back into the custody of the thugs who run China, there won't be enough of him left to fill a can of dog food.

    I fear that the Politburo saw "Eating Raoul" long ago, and saw it as a productive model of what to do with political prisoners. I'm taking bets that Wang Lijun has for some weeks been languishing on a Beijing pet store shelf.
        April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
        Recommended18
        July LIu
        Zhuhai,China

    It's ironnic,when a Chinese has trouble, the first place he turns to is American embassy!
        April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
        Recommended18
            Chinese Netizen
            USA

        Truly, isn't it July? With local "authorities" like the ones abusing him, where else could Mr Chen have gone? To many people, regardless of its faults, America is still the beacon of hope.
            April 27, 2012 at 9:18 p.m.
            Recommended18
        JW
        Cherry Hill, NJ
    NYT Pick

    You have to understand, it's people like Mr. Chen that makes China a great country and Chinese people a great people. It's not those ruthless rulers, nor those apathetic billionaires, nor those mindless celebrities, nor those fierce athletes.

    People like Mr. Chen, ultimately selfless, courageous, and perseverant, are the conscious of the people, and our hope. It's beyond question that U.S. should fight for his freedom as the basic moral obligation to the world, and to yourselves.Any other stance will be equal to sponsoring the ruthless self-interest and materialism.
        April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
        Recommended85

    Read All 4 Replies
            paul m
            boston ma

        blasmaic , the very isolated and spartan house arrest where he had no opportunity to communicate with any one outside , receive news etc or receive adequate medical treatments etc I would only consider "comfortable" relative to the prison treatment of human rights activist Ni Yulan whom guards beat so ferociously they crippled her.
            April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
            Recommended7
            J Stewart
            Boston

        While the US "should fight for his freedom" for its moral reasons, if it does, it will be done after weighing the political and public relations value.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
            Recommended1
            olnpvx
            Chevy Chase, MD

        Unfortunately, 99.9% of Chinese people are unlike Mr. Chen.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:56 a.m.
            Recommended1
        Jonathan
        Ann Arbor, MI

    Wow this guy is like a ninja; being blind and escaping the cordons of all those guards. Someone should make a movie of this. Please protect him US embassy!
        April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
        Recommended59
            Charles A.
            New York, NY

        Daredevil. Now, who wants to get sued by Marvel?
            April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
            Recommended6
            Matt R.
            N.Y.C.

        More obscure, but still on point fictonal character reference: Lee Sin
            April 27, 2012 at 10:34 p.m.
            madupont
            Lancaster

        My goodness, didn't you bother to go see The Last Emperor ? Consequently, George Herbert Walker Bush came to town with his merry men because he was campaigning and there were loose ends to tie up as Abbie Hoffman first emerged from underground to do a water study on the Delaware River's nuclear power plants. He was dead within the month of April. Same symptoms as Marilyn Monroe. Yes, I know, we live in a perfect country with Democracy being refered to by GOP spinners as"Liberals" (a word that was otherwise out of fashion since the retirement of Adlai Stevenson).
            April 27, 2012 at 11:46 p.m.
            Recommended2
        Jonathan
        Ann Arbor, MI

    If Chen is at the US Embassy, and we hand him over to the police like we did Wang Lijun, then sadly we are no better that them. Let's hope democracy and freedom rule the day!
        April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
        Recommended12
            3ddi3 B
            NYC

        I beg to differ, Wang was no saint, if you read something about this guy he was part of the corrupt regime in that city with Bo. Mr Guangcheng is a much more different case that deserves our attention.
        Mr. Wang's desertion would have given us more trouble because he was not really a political refugee, on what basis would we have protected him and how do we get him out?
        Mt Guangcheng is a known activist and has been incarcerated for his beliefs and actions.
            April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
            Recommended20
        Todd
        Atlanta

    someone always has to bring up Wal-Mart, right? News flash: Most of the stuff we buy is manufactured in a low-cost country, be it China, India, or elsewhere. Welcome to the global economy. If you think trade wars are a means towards promoting human rights you are flat out wrong. I hope you feel better about yourself, though. That's all you want, after all.
        April 27, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
        Recommended9
            paul m
            boston ma

        Welcome to the narcissistic Southern US money before human rights / environmental protection agenda - trade wars against South Africa promoted human rights there perfectly well , and its already , even in its infant stages, provoking Israel to reconsider its abuse of the Palestinians - the only reason it often fails is nations with poor human rights records as Saudia Arabia and China will support a nation otherwise under a Western trade embargo - I dont shop at anti American Walmart as a rule
            April 27, 2012 at 11:41 p.m.
            Recommended5
        hunkerdown
        lancaster

    Finally a little guile from this administration...at least, internationally.
    When can we expect a few clever negotiating ploys in dealing with Congress???
        April 27, 2012 at 7:46 p.m.
        Recommended6
        Cory
        Orchard Park, NY

    What do you want people to do who can only afford to shop at Walmart, where the majority of their goods are made by the Chinese? Raise sheep and buy a loom so their kids can have clothes? If you pay a billion workers an extra two cents an hour to make pants, that's an extra 20 million dollars an hour it costs to run your operation. An extreme example but you get my point. Chinese factories employ unskilled workers in numbers Westerners can barely fathom. At that scale, even small changes can cost enormous amounts of money, and that cost ultimately gets passed along to consumers. Americans are good people and would pay more for fair goods, but in an economy where the middle class is rapidly disappearing, many of them simply cannot afford to do so.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:40 p.m.
        Recommended9
            3ddi3 B
            NYC

        Your last statement is the result of the first statement, that is our jobs have disappeared for low quality and cost products, we have moved from a quality society to a disposable one, it all maximizes corporate profit.
        The question is, let's look at the health of the American economy before we turned into this, the American educational system was the envy of the world, we had the best infrastructure, the social mobility was at its highest, and now what?
            April 27, 2012 at 8:39 p.m.
            Recommended7
            Josh Hill
            New London
            Verified

        What 3ddi3 B said. Put simply, the reason working Americans have been impoverished is because globalization removed barriers to billions of low-skilled laborers who will work under terrible conditions for subsistence wages. Since labor costs are high, to compete, companies must move their factories overseas. It doesn't help that countries like China manipulate their currency, bar our products, steal our intellectual property, trash the environment, engage in industrial espionage, and play other cynical games, such as illegally restricting exports of rare earths to force companies to move production to China. But the real blame rests with us: big business, and the politicians in its employ, sold us down the river, and we the public have been too stupid to do anything about it.
            April 28, 2012 at 3:16 a.m.
            Recommended5
        sayitstr8
        sc

    AMERICANS WHO WANT TO MAKE MONEY VIA CHINA - YOU ARE PART OF HIS AND HIS WIFE'S ABUSE - please have some courage and read on.

    understand this: you want to make money, fair enough. but when you support China with your American dollars, you are part of this action, too. they are not separate. when you look at your dividends from your investments in China, please see his wife being kicked repeatedly as you look at your check.

    do you see how it works? It is real. but i do not say this to induce guilt - only awareness. so, if you want to take advantage of China's cheap labor, etc. and products, and companies, fine, do it - but maybe do this too: for everything you take from those ACTIVELY DO SOMETHING to try to change something in China. otherwise you are just part of the chain of torture, antidemocratic action, and abuse. And no real American would want to be part of that, would we?
        April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
        Recommended9
            Blake
            NYC

        If you really care about China, I would say that it would be a good idea to keep economic relations so that we will be able to exert pressure on China.

        If you want to boycott Chinese products, say so directly. There is no need to use a flimsy excuse, and there is nothing wrong to say "buy American."

        The thing is America has stopped producing many things for several decades. China happened to be the supplies in the past 15 years.
            April 27, 2012 at 11:28 p.m.
            Recommended3
        SM
        Brooklyn, NY

    Chen Guangcheng is a completely different kettle of fish from the morally ambiguous Wang Lijun. The US has to suck it up and do the right thing, for this man and his family and any suffering the consequences of assisting him.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
        Recommended45
        zg
        Boston, MA

    This blind man self-taught himself to be a lawyer (not one that works in a law firm, but one that gives free legal advice in rural China), stood up to the brutal abortion policy in the Shangdong province, and now escaped layers of guard surrounding his house in the night, and traveled to Beijing, and hopefully to the US embassy. He is such an inspiration to me!
        April 27, 2012 at 7:39 p.m.
        Recommended26
            GRACE
            HINTERLANDS

        A sighted man could not do what it is alledged that he has done. Surely he had assistance.
            April 27, 2012 at 8:38 p.m.
            Recommended5
        Blake
        NYC

    I do not like what Beijing has done to him, but I have two questions to ask.

    First, with all due respect, how can a blind man or woman become a lawyer? How can he or she practice law? I like blind justice, but a person who cannot read can be easily misled and manipulated by others.

    Second, why should Washington get so deeply involved in other country's issues? Maybe you say this is not a small issue, but rather a matter of principle. Fair enough. If so, we should take care of our business first. America, like all other societies, is not perfect. Also if we wanted to take in dissidents, millions would be happy to become dissidents and come here.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:38 p.m.
        Recommended6

    Read All 11 Replies
            MAC
            OR

        Hahaha, Blake, if "can you please give me the name of a blind lawyer in America" was supposed to be a challenge, I accept:
        http://www.blindlawyer.org/
            April 28, 2012 at 2:02 a.m.
            Recommended6
            CityBumpkin
            Earth

        First, I know a lawyer who is legally blind. He is a prosecutor in Southern/Central California. His office has an assistant (college volunteer usually) who helps him with documents and also in navigating around. I found him to be a capable lawyer and an intelligent man, unlike some people with rather inane prejudices about individuals with disabilities.

        Second, what part of not turning Chen over to the Chinese authorities prevents the US government from "take care of our business"? What business needs to be "taken care of" first before we can do the right thing?

        The US government could stand to be better in many areas of foreign and domestic affairs. But doing the wrong thing here won't make anything better.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:07 a.m.
            Recommended4
            Blake
            NYC

        Sam, Morga, Ca.

        Do not get too carried away. You can disagree with what I wrote, but I do not understand your contempt. The only person who feels that way is either a saint or a fool. We are talking about China, not the UK. America is a great place, but stop being self-righteous and self-congratulatory. Is it possible you have never had independent thinking, but is merely regurgitating what the TV says?
            April 28, 2012 at 7:42 a.m.
            Recommended1
        Matt R.
        N.Y.C.

    So his family has been beaten in the past because of him and he left them behind? Further many who helped him will suffer as well. He had better make more of this escape than to just negotiate his freedom.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
        Recommended3
            zg
            Boston, MA

        I actually think his move will serve himself and his family better in the long term. Under house arrest, those lawless and ruthless security guards can do just about anything to them: harassing, beating, humiliating ... Now he has successfully put himself under the spotlight of international medias, and hopefully also in between the diplomatic tension between US and CHINA, he himself will be safe, and so is his wife, daughter and the rest of his family. Hopefully, with the aid of the American diplomats, he can negotiate his safety and security from top Chinese officials.

        Relating this Chen Guangcheng incident to a previous one involving the former police chief of Chongqing, it seems that whenever a Chinese citizen needs to get certain matters resolved, the US embassy or consulate is the place to go. What a shame on the Chinese government!
            April 27, 2012 at 7:45 p.m.
            Recommended24
        AmatureHistorian
        NYC

    Sounds like DOD, CIA have a hand in this. How was he able to coordinate transportation while under house arrest, evade three levels of guards, travel 8 hours on highway without being tracked by AI and walk pass security protecting the US embassy?

    It is election year in the US and transition year in China. We can see the chess pieces but not the players.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
        Recommended4
            Matt R.
            N.Y.C.

        That or he was set free without knowing it so he could be 'justly' put to death after his 'recapture'
            April 27, 2012 at 9:17 p.m.
            Recommended3
        JC
        SF

    First Bo Xilai and then this Mr. Chen. There will be big change coming to China. The chinese communist party is totally disfunctional. I only hope that the change will not be violent. During Tang dynasty, there was the Chaos of An and Si.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
        Recommended4
        Phoenix
        nyc

    And yet after hearing another tale of abuse led and approved by the most corrupt government we continue to do business with them. Hard to believe. And still they are givered favored nation status courtesy of the USA.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
        Recommended6
            Lennerd
            Shanghai, China

        There is no doubt that at many levels, the government-party set up in China is corrupt. It's just too obvious to ignore, and Chinese people openly acknowledge it.

        What isn't always acknowledged is that in the US the government is almost completely corrupted. Check out NPR's This American Life's coverage of the money in political campaigns. American legislators and the courts are increasingly bought and sold by the Big Money folks and the public, the public interest, the common welfare, the future, and the North American environment is all going to be sacrificed in the interest of corporate profit. If you can't see the handwriting on the wall, well, I can't help you. The possibility of retaining any hope that this will be reversed diminishes almost daily.

        Worse, still is the shredding of the legal protections contained in the US Constitution for individuals. This originated as a bulwark against the powerful in a government from exercising their might without a check against. Now, drone attacks, detention without due process, wire taps, data mining of emails, face-recognition software and security cameras all upon us, what's left? This is not a future of Big Brother. It is now and growing like an unstoppable vine.

        Of course, "they" are doing business with us!
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Something else
        Somewhere else

    This just seems a cheap slam at the Chinese government. This guy didn't even have a Wikipedia article until January. Another one of these straw men propped up like the artist and the underage Tibetan monks.
        April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
        Recommended5

    Read All 6 Replies
            3ddi3 B
            NYC

        So under your dellusional belief, only worthy people are entitled to a Wikipedia entry?
        So how did Christian Bale hear of him? Look at his video on Youtube.
            April 27, 2012 at 10:32 p.m.
            Recommended7
            KC
            San Francisco

        If the artist you refer to in your comment is Ai Wei Wei, I would suggest you take the time to see some of his work before condemning him as a "straw man". Some of his art is powerful and political. Having had the opportunity to see an exhibition of his work abroad, it is easy to understand how an authoritarian government would not be happy with its political content.

        I might add that one's inclusion in Wikipedia is not the be all and end all of political or moral importance.
            April 27, 2012 at 10:36 p.m.
            Recommended9
            wg
            CA

        Are you blind? If not, take a look at the history of the Wikipedia entry "Chen Guangcheng"
            April 28, 2012 at 2:01 a.m.
            Recommended2
        roosevelt
        china
    NYT Pick

    This is the real-life version of "The Shawshank Redemption". This guy is a true hero. People in China are really excited and inspired by his great escape.
        April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
        Recommended58
        Anne
        O.

    I hope he stays safe and healthy. We know about too many rights activists and lawyers who become imprisoned or forcibly institutionalized, where they only emerge later on to be handicapped, mentally disabled or dead. Add to that, that any journalists who dared approached the vicinity of his home were harassed by goons who work above and behind any 'laws'. Disgusting.
        April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
        Recommended20
        DemocracyNow
        East Coast

    Please think about this the next time you stuff your cart with Chinese goods at Wal-Mart.
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended61
            S. Roy
            Toronto, Ontario

        Better yet, each reader should ALSO write to Walmart AND other companies else that why they must NOT source Chinese made products - particularly if products are assembled in and even if the parts are made in Linyi County.

        According to The Economist magazine:

        "The Boston Consulting Group reckons that in areas such as transport, computers, fabricated metals and machinery, 10-30% of the goods that America now imports from China could be made at home by 2020, boosting American output by $20 billion-55 billion a year."

        Let's start it NOW!!
            April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
            Recommended15
            Phoenix
            nyc

        Not just goods at Walmart, you might want to add Apple products to that list too, and just about 99% of what we have in this country comes from China. But doubtful people will forefeit anything. This country wants it now and cheap.
            April 27, 2012 at 7:21 p.m.
            Recommended17
        Bob
        Chicago

    Dr. Valdez, it doesn't seem Mr. Chen's plan is to live at the US Embassy long-term. Rather, that the local authorities were abusing their power and that he might now negotiate a settlement with the national Chinese government to set him free. Regardless, hiding in a friendly embassy sounds like a better alternative than being surrounded by violent, harassing guards.
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended11
        fairmount2010
        philadelphia, pa

    how did he escape?
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended3
            cyworld
            vancouver

        "A blind man has escaped from his heavily guarded home", Heavily! OMG, the guards must be blind too! So this guy can travel cross 3 provinces to Beijing that is over 400KM away without chasing and questioning by the local authorities.Guess what, they must full of blind police in their force as well.
            April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
            Recommended7
        Pierce Randall
        Atlanta, GA

    That's a tough case. Better relations with China, or respecting human rights?

    If the US protects this guy, then probably our connections with China could cushion the blow. After all, the US does not have terrible relations with France, which held Roman Polanski. On the other hand, if the US were to protect Fu, then other dissidents might seek asylum in US embassies. Eventually, this could get out of hand, and US-Chinese relations could become a bit tenser. The consequences of good Chinese-US relations are great, because we're two economic superpowers that represent different spheres of interest in a world that's still politically divided.

    On the other hand, protecting human rights is important. It's also important to not that China does not have sovereign rights in this case. If their detention of Fu is a violation of Fu's civil rights--as it certainly seems to be--then Chinese national sovereignty is not entitled to US forbearance with respect to Fu's detention, any more than thieves are entitled to the forbearance of others that they keep what they have stolen. It might be prudent to act as though China's sovereign rights are inviolate, to avoid bad consequences, but this would be a useful illusion.

    It seems like the best thing we could do would be to arrange for a country that has little interest in good Chinese relations to take Fu. I'm not sure who that would be--Israel? Argentina? Uruguay?
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended6
            AmatureHistorian
            NYC

        The Vatican. Underground churches in China are doing the Vatican's bidding.
            April 27, 2012 at 7:23 p.m.
            Recommended3
        happykt
        Austin

    That's a great system the Chinese government has over there -- if you complain about government neglect or abuse, or stick up for human and civil rights, they beat the hell out of you throw you in prison and if you get out of prison alive, they keep you a prisoner in your own house, while government thugs still beat and torture you ... And the Chinese governement calls their form of government ideal?
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended32
        wonderwall
        Oakland

    Defect to the USA Mr. Chen. My family will take you in.

    Also "Dr" Ricardo, how would you like to be beaten in your own house?
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended21
        Rohan
        Jericho

    I bet someone in Hollywood is considering turning this into a movie script
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended1
        Eric Chang
        Palo Alto

    How long will we continue tolerate the human right abuses in China? after iPhone10 launch? How many iPads can we scroll at the same time?
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended21
            Phoenix
            nyc

        @ Eric...............exactly!!!!
            April 27, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
            Recommended4
        LG
        Chicago
    NYT Pick

    "forcibly sterilized thousands of women." Wow. Clearly conceptions of human rights differ drastically from the rest of the developed world in China. On the one hand, I want to respect their autonomy, and not impose the Western humanistic vision (that even the West spends much of its time not quite living up to) on China; but then on the other hand, permanently raping thousands of the citizens officials are sworn to serve is about as terrible an act as can be imagined to this particular Westerner. If China wants to convince the world of its modernity, they need to realize that that doesn't stop at pollution and production.
        April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
        Recommended15

    Read All 9 Replies
            J. Tse
            Flushing, NY

        In reply to David, the ones who exported the dirty manufacturing are the large corporations whom the average American has little control over. And for your information, the people who gladly took the job were the Chinese companies who run the factories (and guess who owns those companies). It takes two to tango my friend.
            April 27, 2012 at 9:36 p.m.
            Recommended5
            April Kane
            38.034506N 78.486474W

        As I understand it, there aren't birth control pills available for all Chinese women and the country was facing a population growth that it couldn't sustain. They don't grow enough food to feed all. Hence the one child per family law.

        Plus the portion of the population that doesn't live in the cities live in an agrarian society where the tradition of having children to help with the farm has been difficult to overcome.

        We used to have that tradition here too before we became a country of corporate farming with huge farm equipment to plant and pick the crops.
            April 28, 2012 at 2:54 a.m.
            Recommended1
            RichWa
            Banks, OR

        Along with what Matt R. wrote, countless women are being forced to carry unwanted pregnancies (regardless of whether due to rape, incest, etc) to term in the U.S.A. Is the government power to "forcibly sterilized thousands of women." any different than the power of government (both state and federal) to forcibly require women to bear unwanted children?
            April 28, 2012 at 11:45 p.m.
        Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez
        Austin, Texas

    Hmmmm

    So.. he escaped house arrest... to live in hiding, in a house?

    I do not think he is very smart.
        April 27, 2012 at 5:07 p.m.
        Recommended3
            elizabeth
            seattle

        Ricardo G. Valdez,
        The more you read, the more you'll understand. Even before you read and understand, I think you can grasp that hiding in a safe place and getting the word out is better than being imprisoned and abused in your home. This man is more concerned with bringing abuses to light, and trying to improve life for many, than with his own comfort. Smart, yes, and also courageous and compassionate.
            April 27, 2012 at 6:13 p.m.
            Recommended34
            S. Roy
            Toronto, Ontario

        "I do not think he is very smart."

        Really. Let's see, he has been tortured, imprisoned, his wife was beaten, his daughter is followed everyday to school, his relatives' homes invaded, etc. etc.

        What would you have done - esteemed Dr. Ricardo Garres Valdez of Austin, Texas?

        And he is not smart - to escape? He is a GENUINE hero - in the strictest sense of the word - by rising up against the one of most brutal regimes. It is also so very easy to comment, chastise, ridicule - even pontificate - living in a democratic country. But to do that in a totalitarian country such as China is something ENTIRELY different.
            April 27, 2012 at 6:58 p.m.
            Recommended44
        peace
        atlanta

    We import most of our goods from them with no regard to to their abuses. Civil rights once meant something to the USA. Horrible!
        April 27, 2012 at 5:07 p.m.
        Recommended37
            Phoenix
            nyc

        Civil rights do not enter into the picture when we want our i-pads. pods, game boys, WII, stuff, nintendo, more stuff cheap and fast. Don't ever forget that. This country has lost it's footing and I'm affraid it's all man for himself. Nothing more.
            April 27, 2012 at 7:23 p.m.
            Recommended9
            phylum chordata
            earth

        Maybe if the uncharged Bradley Manning escapes, Americans will cheer his shelter in the Chinese embassy too.
            April 27, 2012 at 9:04 p.m.
            Recommended7



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